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Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Helps and Documents

Note: The Nova program is administered at the Council level. Check with your local council about availability before starting on a Nova award.

The Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award, named after the accomplished astronaut and physician, stands as a beacon of inspiration for young minds eager to explore the wonders of the cosmos and make a lasting impact on our world. It is the bronze (first) level Supernova Award for Scouts BSA, which recognizes the achievements of Scouts who have displayed exceptional dedication, passion, and curiosity in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

dr bernard harris supernova award

Dr. Bernard A. Harris Jr. is a remarkable individual who made history by becoming the first African American to walk in space. He embarked on this extraordinary journey aboard the space shuttle Discovery in 1995 during the STS-63 mission. Beyond his stellar achievements as an astronaut, Dr. Harris holds a medical degree and has dedicated his life to promoting STEM education among young people. It is with great admiration that the Boy Scouts of America named this STEM achievement award after this distinguished pioneer.

The Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award presents Scouts with a unique opportunity to delve into the vast realms of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. This award is designed to challenge and engage young minds, encouraging them to pursue excellence in these critical fields. By completing a series of rigorous requirements, Scouts expand their knowledge and develop practical skills, preparing them for future scientific endeavors.

While the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award is an outstanding accomplishment in itself, the benefits extend far beyond the accolade. Scouts who embark on this STEM-centric journey develop a passion for scientific inquiry, problem-solving, and critical thinking that can shape their academic and professional pursuits. Furthermore, this award sets them apart on college applications and opens doors to scholarships and opportunities in STEM-related fields.

The Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award not only recognizes individual achievements but also serves as a catalyst for inspiring a new generation of innovators. By encouraging Scouts to explore the frontiers of STEM, this award plays a pivotal role in cultivating a diverse and inclusive scientific community. It fosters an appreciation for the wonders of the universe, promotes scientific literacy, and instills the confidence to tackle the challenges that lie ahead.

Answers and Helps

Where Can I Find the Answers for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award?

Find specific helps for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award requirements listed on this page. Some of these resources will just give example answers. Others will provide background information to help you understand the questions.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 1: Nova Awards

Complete any three of the Scouts BSA Nova awards. (Note: These may be done at any time after becoming a Scouts BSA member.)

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 1 Helps and Answers

Shoot Scouts BSA Nova Award

Shoot! (Astronomy and Projectile Science)

Shoot! is an exciting Scouts BSA Nova Award focused on exploring astronomy and projectile science. It allows Scouts to investigate how science impacts their daily lives, and it can be used toward requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award. To earn the Shoot! award, Scouts must complete a science-related merit badge and discover more about topics like space, aviation, and weather. They also have the opportunity to visit a museum or engage in hands-on projects such as building catapults, pitching machines, or marble runs.

Let It Grow Scouts BSA Nova Award

Let It Grow (Food and Agriculture Science)

Let It Grow is an engaging Scouts BSA Nova Award that focuses on exploring the fascinating world of food and agriculture science. It offers Scouts the opportunity to fulfill part of requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award. Through this award, Scouts will gain knowledge about the origins of their food, delve into subjects like weather, seeds, and microorganisms, and develop a deeper understanding of the vital role agriculture plays in our lives.

Splash! (Science)

Splash! is a Scouts BSA Nova Award that focuses on the realm of water science. It offers Scouts the opportunity to fulfill part of requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award. Scouts must completing a science-related merit badge and dive into various topics including pollution, health, the water cycle, waste treatment, and the process of water consumption. Through this award, Scouts gain valuable knowledge about the importance of water and its impact on our environment and daily lives.

Mendel’s Minions (Genetic Science)

Mendel’s Minions is an intriguing Scouts BSA Nova Award that focuses on the world of genetic science. It presents Scouts with the opportunity to fulfill part of requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award by completing a science-related merit badge and exploring various topics including DNA, inheritance, genetic diseases, genetically modified food, and the groundbreaking Human Genome Project. Through this award, Scouts gain a deeper understanding of how genetics shape our world and the impact it has on our lives.

Start Your Engines Scouts BSA Nova Award

Start Your Engines! (Technology)

Start Your Engines! is a Scouts BSA Nova Award that focuses on exploring the world of technology. It offers Scouts the opportunity to fulfill part of requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award by completing a technology-related merit badge and delving into topics such as energy and fuel sources. As part of the award, Scouts get to showcase their creativity and engineering skills by designing and building a functional model vehicle powered by solar, wind, or battery power.

Hello World (Programming and Coding Technology)

Hello World is a Scouts BSA Nova Award that focuses on the exciting realm of coding and programming. Scouts have the opportunity to complete part of requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award by completing a digital technology-related merit badge and exploring topics such as functions, loops, variables, and URLs. Through this award, Scouts discover the power of coding and how it allows them to create programs that can assist them in various ways, unveiling the endless possibilities of computer programming.

Whoosh Scouts BSA Nova Award

Whoosh! (Engineering)

Whoosh! is a Scouts BSA Nova Award that focuses on exploring engineering in the context of motion. Scouts have the opportunity to fulfill part of requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award by completing an engineering or motion-related merit badge and delving into topics like machines and forces. As part of the award, Scouts unleash their creativity by envisioning their own designs for amusement park attractions, playground equipment, or innovative methods of transportation.

Up and Away (Fluid Dynamics)

Up and Away is a Scouts BSA Nova Award that focuses on exploring the captivating world of fluid dynamics. Scouts have the opportunity to fulfill requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award. As part of the award, Scouts conduct experiments related to terminal velocity, airfoils, or emergency supply drops, and also have the chance to visit a location such as a wind tunnel or aviation museum, either in person or online.

Next Big Thing (Product Design)

Next Big Thing is an exciting Scouts BSA Nova Award that explores the science of product design. Scouts have the opportunity to fulfill requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award by completing a design-related merit badge and exploring topics like prototypes, market research, brainstorming, and painstorming. As part of the award, Scouts unleash their creativity by envisioning a new product and bringing it to life through a 3D model or a sketch of the design.

Designed to Crunch Scouts BSA Nova Award

Designed to Crunch (Mathematics)

Designed to Crunch is a Scouts BSA Nova Award that focuses on the world of mathematics. Scouts can fulfill requirement 1 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award by completing a mathematics-related merit badge and exploring topics like calculating horsepower, statistics for athletics events, and star counts. Through this award, Scouts gain a deeper understanding of the practical applications of mathematics in various fields, enhancing their problem-solving and analytical skills along the way.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 2: Scholarship Merit Badge

Earn the Scholarship merit badge.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 2 Helps and Answers

Scholarship Merit Badge

Working on the Scholarship merit badge not only equips Scouts with valuable skills for academic success but also fulfills requirement 2 for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award. Through this merit badge, Scouts delve into various study skills, learn about the significance of extracurricular activities, and explore the connection between their current education and future career aspirations. This award empowers Scouts to embrace a well-rounded approach to education, preparing them for a bright and promising future.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 3: STEM Merit Badges

Earn four of the Supernova approved merit badges from the list below. (Note: These may be earned at any time after becoming a member of Scouts BSA.)

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement e Helps and Answers

Animal Science

The Animal Science merit badge equips Scouts with the knowledge and skills to identify and care for different breeds of livestock, such as beef cattle, dairy animals, horses, sheep, hogs, or avian breeds. By studying these animals, Scouts fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award, focusing on exploring career opportunities in the field of animal science.

Archaeology

The Archaeology merit badge provides a captivating avenue for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts engaging in this badge uncover the significance of sites and artifacts from the past, gaining insight into how these discoveries contribute to a more accurate understanding of our ancestors’ way of life. Through the badge, Scouts also develop an understanding of the laws and regulations in place to protect archaeological sites, fostering a sense of responsibility for preserving our cultural heritage. Additionally, Scouts participate in hands-on research, allowing them to actively explore the methods and techniques used in archaeological investigations. Furthermore, Scouts have the opportunity to explore diverse career paths within the field of archaeology, nurturing their curiosity about potential future opportunities and the vital roles archaeologists play in unraveling our collective history.

Architecture

By engaging in the Architecture merit badge, Scouts acquire knowledge about how the design of buildings influences both their functionality and the surrounding environment. They also have the opportunity to discover various career paths connected to the field of architecture. This badge serves as a suitable option for fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Astronomy

The Astronomy merit badge offers an illuminating journey for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts embarking on this badge delve into the wonders of the cosmos, expanding their knowledge about telescopes, binoculars, and the impact of light pollution on stargazing. They explore the captivating realms of planets, stars, and constellations, unraveling the mysteries of our celestial surroundings. In their pursuit, Scouts have the opportunity to visit a planetarium, spend time observing the sky, or even host a star party, fostering a deeper appreciation for the vastness of the universe. Additionally, Scouts are encouraged to explore diverse career opportunities related to astronomy, igniting their curiosity about potential future paths and the important roles astronomers play in unraveling the secrets of the cosmos.

Automotive Maintenance Merit Badge Helps and Documents

Automotive Maintenance

Through the Automotive Maintenance merit badge, Scouts gain essential knowledge and skills in the upkeep of automobiles. They focus on areas such as tires, engines, cooling systems, fuel systems, ignition, electrical systems, drive trains, brakes, and dashboards. Furthermore, Scouts learn to interpret and read the different gauges and meters found in vehicles. This badge also provides an opportunity to explore career pathways associated with automotive maintenance. It satisfies requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Aviation

The Aviation merit badge offers Scouts an exciting path to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Through this badge, Scouts delve into the captivating realm of aviation, acquiring knowledge about various aircraft and the fundamental forces that act upon them during flight. They also gain insights into the crucial aspects of maintaining aircraft and the intricate process of planning for a successful flight. By building and flying a model airplane, Scouts experience firsthand the thrill of flight and apply their understanding of aerodynamics. Furthermore, Scouts have the opportunity to explore a wide range of careers related to aviation, sparking their curiosity about potential future paths in this dynamic industry.

Bird Study

Through the Bird Study merit badge, Scouts immerse themselves in the world of birds, expanding their knowledge by studying, identifying, and observing a diverse range of avian species. They develop an appreciation for birdsong and learn how to create and maintain a nurturing environment for these feathered creatures. This badge offers an opportunity for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Chemistry

During the Chemistry merit badge, Scouts delve into the fascinating world of substances and their interactions, gaining a deeper understanding of this fundamental science. They prioritize lab safety protocols and engage in hands-on experiments to explore and discover various chemical phenomena. Additionally, Scouts have the opportunity to explore potential career paths within fields related to chemistry. This badge serves as a valuable component in fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Composite Materials

Through the Composite Materials merit badge, Scouts gain knowledge about the properties and applications of composite materials. They learn the safe handling and working procedures for resins and other components used in composite materials. Furthermore, Scouts have the opportunity to explore career possibilities within the field of composite materials. This badge fulfills requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Dentistry

Through the Dentistry merit badge, Scouts acquire knowledge on maintaining optimal oral health by learning effective practices to keep teeth and gums healthy. They explore the equipment and techniques employed by dentists in their profession. Additionally, Scouts have the opportunity to explore careers within the field of oral health. This badge serves as a valuable component in fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Digital Technology

The Digital Technology merit badge offers Scouts an enlightening journey to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts engaged in this badge gain valuable knowledge about the storage and transmission of digital information, delving into the fascinating world of digital technology. They explore the evolution of digital technology over the years, understanding its profound impact on society. Moreover, Scouts investigate the practical aspects of digital technology, experiencing hands-on activities that enhance their understanding of its applications. As part of their exploration, Scouts also have the opportunity to explore diverse career paths within the field of digital technology, igniting their curiosity about potential future opportunities in this ever-growing and influential industry.

Drafting

Through the Drafting merit badge, Scouts acquire the skills to create accurate and detailed drawings that effectively communicate the visions of engineers and architects. They gain proficiency in both manual drafting techniques and computer-aided design (CAD), as well as the art of lettering. Additionally, Scouts have the opportunity to explore various career paths in the field of drafting. This badge allows Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Electricity

Through the Electricity merit badge, Scouts gain a comprehensive understanding of the numerous applications of electricity, encompassing electromagnets, batteries, home lighting, motors, and other related concepts. They learn crucial safety measures to ensure the responsible use of electricity and prevent potential hazards. Scouts also have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience by working with simple electric circuits and devices. This badge provides a pathway for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Electronics

By engaging in the Electronics merit badge, Scouts acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to safely repair, modify, or construct electronic devices. They delve into the intricacies of controllers, audio circuits, and digital circuits, expanding their understanding of electronics. Scouts also have the opportunity to explore various career possibilities within the field of electronics. This badge serves as a suitable option for fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Energy

Through the Energy merit badge, Scouts gain knowledge about energy and conservation, learning about the importance of responsible energy usage. They engage in practical activities such as conducting an energy audit at home, aiming to reduce energy consumption over a two-week period. Additionally, Scouts explore the concept of renewable energy sources, expanding their understanding of sustainable practices. This badge not only provides valuable insights into energy conservation but also aligns with requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Engineering

The Engineering merit badge provides an engaging pathway for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts undertaking this badge gain valuable insights into the process of building and creating products and structures, delving into the dynamic world of engineering. They actively investigate the diverse range of careers available in the field of engineering, igniting their curiosity about potential future paths. Furthermore, Scouts explore how engineers employ a step-by-step approach to make meaningful improvements for society, understanding the crucial role engineering plays in shaping our world and enhancing the well-being of communities.

Environmental Science Merit Badge

Environmental Science

Through the Environmental Science merit badge, Scouts gain knowledge about key ecological concepts, including pollution, endangered species, and the vital role of bees in pollination. They explore a wide range of environmental topics, deepening their understanding of the natural world. By conducting repeated observations, Scouts also investigate the interconnectedness and interactions among different components of ecosystems. This badge fosters an appreciation for environmental stewardship and fulfills requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Farm Mechanics

While pursuing the Farm Mechanics merit badge, Scouts develop the necessary skills to safely maintain and repair farm equipment. They learn to perform tasks such as tightening hydraulic fittings, inspecting air filters, and cleaning equipment used in agricultural operations. In addition, Scouts have the opportunity to explore various career paths related to farm mechanics. This badge provides practical knowledge in the field of agriculture and aligns with requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Fish and Wildlife Management

The Fish and Wildlife Management merit badge presents a captivating opportunity for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts engaged in this badge delve into the intricate study of fish, birds, mammals, and other wildlife populations, acquiring knowledge about their behaviors, habitats, and conservation. By exploring the habitats of wildlife, Scouts gain a deeper understanding of the delicate balance between species and their environment. Furthermore, Scouts have the chance to explore diverse career opportunities in this field, igniting their curiosity about potential future paths related to fish and wildlife management. Through their participation, Scouts foster a sense of stewardship and appreciation for the natural world and the vital role they can play in its protection and preservation.

Forestry

Through the Forestry merit badge, Scouts develop the ability to identify various tree species, expanding their knowledge of the natural world. They gain an understanding of the significance of forests in relation to the economy, climate, wildlife habitats, and endangered species. Scouts also explore forest management practices, including sustainable harvesting methods. Additionally, they learn to recognize trees that may pose a threat due to being unhealthy or hazardous. This badge facilitates an appreciation for the importance of forest conservation and aligns with requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Game Design

During the Game Design merit badge, Scouts gain insights into the various components that make up games. They explore thematic elements, game play elements, and engage in game analysis to better understand the mechanics behind successful games. Scouts analyze an existing game and have the opportunity to design their own game, fostering creativity and critical thinking. Moreover, they also explore potential career paths within the field of game design. This badge aligns with requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Gardening

Through the Gardening merit badge, Scouts engage in hands-on activities such as planting flowers and vegetables, fostering an appreciation for horticulture. They learn essential safety practices for gardening and conduct seed germination experiments, gaining an understanding of the science behind successful plant growth. Scouts explore the vital role of pollination in gardening and familiarize themselves with different methods like composting, vermiposting, and hydroponics. This badge not only encourages environmental stewardship but also aligns with requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Geocaching

The Geocaching merit badge is a great choice to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts who pursue this badge will gain valuable skills in safely locating and documenting geocaches, which are hidden treasures found using GPS technology. Exploring geocaches not only enhances navigation abilities but also adds an exciting element of discovery as Scouts have the chance to leave or take small trinkets while logging their finds.

Geology

The Geology merit badge offers a fulfilling pathway to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts embarking on this journey gain in-depth knowledge about rocks and resources, delving into fascinating subjects such as sedimentary processes, energy resources, mineral resources, and the rich tapestry of Earth’s history. Furthermore, Scouts have the chance to explore diverse career opportunities in the field of geology, igniting their curiosity about potential future paths and the important role geologists play in understanding our planet.

health care professions merit badge

Health Care Professions

The Health Care Professions merit badge equips youth with the opportunity to explore the diverse range of healthcare fields, enabling them to understand the various types of professionals and their collaborative efforts to promote and maintain people’s well-being. Through this badge, Scouts gain valuable knowledge about the teamwork and coordination essential for the effective functioning of healthcare professionals, offering them a valuable experience towards fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Insect Study

The Insect Study merit badge serves as an another option to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts immersed in this badge gain valuable insights into the fascinating world of insects, learning about their identifying characteristics and differentiating between hazardous and harmless species while acquiring essential knowledge on how to avoid and respond to potential risks, including administering first aid when needed. Through observing a variety of insects, Scouts deepen their understanding of these remarkable creatures. Furthermore, they also explore exciting career opportunities in fields closely connected to the study of insects, igniting their curiosity about potential future paths and the vital roles insects play in various industries and ecosystems.

Inventing

The Inventing merit badge teaches Scouts the ins and outs of creating a new invention, including valuable lessons on intellectual property rights. By utilizing their newfound knowledge, Scouts have the opportunity to unleash their creativity, conceptualize an innovative idea, and bring it to life by crafting a prototype. This badge can be used to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Mammal Study

The Mammal Study merit badge provides an enriching avenue to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts engaging in this badge delve into the world of mammals, acquiring knowledge about their physical characteristics and the diverse habitats they inhabit. Through their exploration, Scouts gain an understanding of how a mammal’s environment directly impacts its population, and they have the opportunity to carry out a project related to this concept. By actively participating in this badge, Scouts develop a deeper appreciation for the intricate relationships between mammals and their habitats, fostering a sense of environmental stewardship.

Mining in Society

Through the Mining in Society merit badge, Scouts delve into various facets of the mining industry, gaining insights into the processes involved in mineral extraction and material transportation. Additionally, they have the chance to explore diverse career paths associated with mining. This badge proves instrumental in fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Nature

The Nature merit badge is a fascinating journey for scouts to discover the wonders of plants, animals, and the intricate web of life. By exploring various wildlife species, scouts not only gain knowledge but also understand the vital role each creature plays in maintaining the delicate balance of ecosystems. This merit badge fulfills requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. It encourages scouts to delve into the interconnectedness of nature and appreciate the significance of different wildlife in our world.

Nuclear Science

The Nuclear Science merit badge offers a comprehensive exploration of radiation, fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts engaging in this badge gain knowledge about the various uses and hazards of radiation, understanding its impact on the world around us. They delve into the intriguing realm of matter and forces, unraveling the intricate interactions within nuclear science. Moreover, Scouts have the opportunity to explore diverse career paths in fields related to radiation safety and nuclear science, sparking their curiosity about the professional possibilities available in this important field of study.

Oceanography

Through the Oceanography merit badge, Scouts embark on a fascinating journey into the world of marine life, exploring topics such as the properties of seawater, the mechanics of waves, the intricate underwater topography, and understanding the vital significance of the oceans. By engaging in hands-on activities and learning about the methodologies employed by marine scientists to study the vast oceans, Scouts gain valuable insights into the wonders of marine ecosystems while making progress towards fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Plant Science

With the Plant Science merit badge, Scouts acquire valuable skills in propagating and cultivating plants. They explore the significance and practical applications of various crops, trees, and flowers, while having the flexibility to select specific plant types to study in-depth. This badge serves as an ideal choice to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Programming

The Programming merit badge not only equips scouts with knowledge about the history of programming, programming languages, and code modification but also fulfills requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award, which encourages scouts to explore various careers related to programming and understand the practical applications of this valuable skill in the professional world.

Pulp and Paper

The Pulp and Paper merit badge provides an immersive experience for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Through this badge, Scouts gain insight into the fascinating world of paper products, learning about their manufacturing processes and diverse applications. They also delve into the concepts of recycling and forest management, understanding the importance of sustainability in the paper industry. As part of their journey, Scouts have the hands-on opportunity to create their own piece of paper, fostering a sense of creativity and accomplishment. Furthermore, they explore a range of career opportunities related to paper making, opening their eyes to potential future paths within this industry.

Radio

During the pursuit of the Radio merit badge, Scouts uncover the captivating realm of broadcast radio and hobby radio, unraveling the ways in which radio waves facilitate global communication. Scouts gain an understanding of the various components that make up a radio and apply their newfound knowledge by engaging in activities related to amateur radio, radio broadcasting, or shortwave radio, thus meeting the requirements necessary to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Reptile and Amphibian Study

The Reptile and Amphibian Study merit badge immerses Scouts in the captivating world of alligators, crocodiles, toads, frogs, salamanders, lizards, snakes, and other fascinating creatures. By studying their identifying traits, Scouts gain a deep understanding of these animals. They also have the opportunity to care for their own reptiles or amphibians or observe them at a zoo, while delving into the important distinctions between species that can pose a risk and those that can make suitable pets. This badge satisfies requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Robotics Merit Badge

Robotics

This merit badge offers Scouts a comprehensive understanding of the versatile applications of robots. Through its requirements, they gain knowledge and skills in designing and testing robots to accomplish straightforward tasks, fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Additionally, Scouts get the opportunity to delve into the world of competitive robotics and explore potential career paths associated with this fascinating field.

Scuba Diving

The Scuba merit badge offers a thrilling opportunity for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award, as they embark on a safe and captivating exploration of the underwater world. Through this badge, Scouts not only gain knowledge about the intricate aquatic ecosystems but also earn their Open Water Diver Certification, equipping them with essential skills for underwater adventures. In addition, Scouts have the chance to investigate a range of career opportunities related to the scuba industry, igniting their curiosity about potential future paths and the diverse roles available in this exciting field.

Signs, Signals, and Codes

As Scouts delve into the fascinating Signs, Signals, and Codes merit badge, they will be introduced to a multitude of communication methods, including distress signals, Morse code, sign language, braille, semaphore, and even contemporary forms like text message symbols and emojis. Through this exploration, Scouts develop a comprehensive understanding of diverse communication tools, enabling them to effectively convey messages across different mediums and satisfying the requirements for fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Soil and Water Conservation

Through the Soil and Water Conservation merit badge, Scouts gain valuable knowledge about various topics including erosion, watersheds, aquifers, water pollution, and water treatment. They also develop an understanding of the vital role that plants play in the conservation of soil and water resources. This badge equips Scouts with the necessary understanding to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Space Exploration

During their pursuit of the Space Exploration merit badge, Scouts acquire knowledge about spacecraft and delve into the historical context of their utilization. They explore various facets of venturing into space and contemplate the future of humanity’s exploration beyond Earth, aligning with requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Additionally, Scouts discover potential career avenues linked to the exciting realm of space exploration.

Surveying

The Surveying merit badge presents an engaging pathway to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts undertaking this badge actively participate in marking and recording land boundaries, gaining practical skills in this essential field. They delve into the principles of distance measurement, learning both traditional techniques and the use of GPS technology. Furthermore, Scouts have the opportunity to explore diverse career opportunities in the field of surveying, igniting their curiosity about potential future paths and the important roles surveyors play in mapping and land management.

Sustainability Merit Badge Helps and Documents

Sustainability

Engaging in the Sustainability merit badge, Scouts gain valuable insights into energy conservation practices within their homes and cultivate an awareness of the broader societal impact of their food, housing, and consumption choices. By crafting a thoughtful plan to utilize Earth’s resources more prudently, Scouts actively contribute to building a sustainable future. Moreover, through the exploration of the Scout Law and the Scout Oath, Scouts recognize the significant role these guiding principles play in fostering sustainable communities, fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Veterinary Medicine

Through the Soil and Water Conservation merit badge, Scouts gain valuable knowledge about various topics including erosion, watersheds, aquifers, water pollution, and water treatment. They also develop an understanding of the vital role that plants play in the conservation of soil and water resources. This badge equips Scouts with the necessary understanding to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award.

Weather

Engaging in the requirements for the Weather merit badge equips Scouts with a comprehensive understanding of meteorology. They delve into topics such as weather hazards, high and low pressure systems, the scientific principles underlying weather phenomena, and the water cycle. Scouts also investigate different climates and the impact of human activities on the environment, while fulfilling requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Moreover, they have the opportunity to construct a weather instrument and explore potential career paths associated with meteorology.

Welding

The Welding merit badge offers an immersive experience for Scouts to fulfill requirement 3 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova award. Scouts actively engage in the art of metalwork, learning to sketch, tack, and weld metal while developing valuable skills. Throughout the badge, Scouts also become well-versed in safety procedures, ensuring they are alert to possible hazards associated with welding. Furthermore, Scouts have the opportunity to explore a wide range of career opportunities within the field of welding, fostering their curiosity about potential future paths and the important roles welders play in various industries.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 4: Supernova Activities

Complete TWO Supernova activity topics, one each in two different STEM areas

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 4 Helps and Answers

Supernova STEM Activities: Exploring, Creating, and Communicating in the World of Science and Technology

In STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, mathematics), there are three Supernova activity topics to choose from. These activities are designed to challenge and support students in their STEM journey. Each activity consists of two parts. Part 1 involves research, preparation, set up, coordination, or organization, while Part 2 includes analysis, reflection, experimentation, design, or invention. Scouts are expected to create a report based on their chosen activity.

The format of the report can vary, and students are encouraged to be creative. They can choose from options such as an oral report, a written report, a poster presentation, a virtual poster, a video production, a multifaceted format, or their own unique format with the approval of their mentor. The objective is to effectively communicate what they have learned and how they learned it to others. The report should provide sufficient detail for someone unfamiliar with the topic to understand the content. Students are encouraged to incorporate various presentation methods and use technology to enhance their reports.

Speak to your counselor for more details.

Supernova Activity Topics for Science

  • Environmental Science: New Things From Old – This activity involves researching and exploring the logistics and environmental value of recycling and repurposing used items into new products. The first part requires finding two products primarily made from recycled materials and discussing their impact on the environment compared to products made with new materials. The second part involves inventing a product predominantly made from recycled or repurposed items and creating a report detailing its design specifications, mass production potential, and environmental soundness.
  • Movie “Science”: Misconceptions, Misunderstandings, and Mistakes – This activity involves watching a movie or television show about space travel and identifying scientific or technological advancements that violate currently accepted principles or misrepresent available technology. The first part requires finding two instances of such violations or misrepresentations and discussing them. The second part involves creating a report addressed to the producers, providing suggestions to make the movie more scientifically accurate, realistic, and plausible.
  • Household Chemistry: Diet Coke and Mentos Explosions – This activity focuses on investigating the phenomenon of dropping Mentos candy into a two-liter bottle of Diet Coke, resulting in an explosive reaction. The first part involves researching the experiment and its underlying principles, formulating a hypothesis, and designing an experiment to test it. The second part involves conducting the experiment, analyzing the results, and creating a report describing the hypothesis, experiment, and conclusions.

Supernova Activity Topics for Technology

  • Energy Technology – This activity focuses on learning about the various methods of energy production, storage, and use. It involves arranging a field trip to sites such as power plants or energy-efficient buildings to explore innovative and historical examples of energy technology. The participants are required to create a report that describes the field trip and discusses the current state, historical development, and future directions of the chosen energy production or use method, along with its impact on the environment, natural resources, and economy.
  • Communication Technology – In this activity, the participants act as the communication chair for a science fair and develop a communication plan for effective and efficient communication among the participants. They gather contact information from all individuals involved and create a communication plan that includes broadcasting messages to subgroups and emergency communication procedures. The participants test their plan by playing Mad Libs, where they request different types of words from the recipients using various communication modes. Finally, they analyze the effectiveness of their communication plan and create a report outlining their plan, implementation, and any unexpected events or improvements.
  • Entertainment Technology – This activity involves exploring the special effects used in movies to create illusions and learning about the technologies behind them. Participants choose a movie with extensive special effects and study the supplemental material to understand how those effects were created. They select a scene or frame from the movie and describe in detail to their mentor how the special effects were utilized. The participants then develop a plan to create a still photo or a short video that would require special effects, discussing the sequence of events and the involvement of professionals. They create a report demonstrating their understanding of special effects and how they would apply them to their envisioned photo or video.

Supernova Activity Topics for Engineering

  • Deconstruct and Analyze: Mechanical Designs – This activity involves deconstructing a complex mechanical device, such as a bicycle, and analyzing its components. The participants choose a suitable device, gather the necessary tools, and take it apart while documenting the process through pictures and notes. They identify the major components, understand how they work individually and together, analyze the advantages of specific parts or circuits, discuss potential failures, maintenance requirements, and suggest design improvements. The participants create a report that documents the deconstruction process, component analysis, and their findings.
  • Build and Test: High-Performance Paper Gliders – This activity focuses on building and testing high-performance paper gliders to understand how design variations affect their flight characteristics. The participants conduct background research on gliders and the physics of flight, choose a glider design, identify quantitative and qualitative characteristics to test, hypothesize how design variations will influence the performance, build four gliders with variations, establish consistent testing methods, and record the results. They analyze the data, predict performance based on variations, suggest an ideal design, and create a report presenting the glider, flight tests, data, conclusions, and procedures followed.
  • Design and Redesign: Egg Drop Contest – In this activity, participants design a container to protect a raw egg from breaking when dropped from a height. They conduct research on the physical forces involved and desirable container materials, establish constraints and rules for the contest, design and build their containers, and conduct the contest. After analyzing their container’s performance, they discuss their design strategy and redesign the container for improved performance within the given constraints. The participants create a report describing their original container, design strategy, performance analysis, redesigned container, and any changes they would make to the constraints.

Supernova Activity Topics for Mathematics

  • From Simulations to Real Life: Modeling Bungee Jumping – Participants simulate bungee jumping using rubber bands and an action figure to determine the number of rubber bands needed for a safe jump from different heights. They tape weights to the action figure, attach rubber bands to its feet, and drop it from various heights, measuring the drop height and calculating averages. They continue adding rubber bands and record the average drop height for different numbers of rubber bands. Participants create a scatter plot of the data and determine a line of best fit. They make predictions based on the line and test them, analyzing the outcome and discussing safety protocols and statistics related to bungee jumping. A report is created for the Acme Daredevil Adventure Company.
  • Linking the Past to the Future: Predicting Old Faithful’s Next Eruption – Participants analyze past data on Old Faithful’s eruptions to devise a strategy for predicting its next eruption. They gather information on geysers, obtain data on intervals between eruptions for Old Faithful, create graphical displays of the data, analyze patterns, and refine their prediction strategy. They determine the variability in eruption intervals, analyze the graphical displays, estimate eruptions for a specific period, compare estimates to actual eruption times, and create a report explaining their prediction strategy and findings.
  • A Paradox of Counting: Voting Methods and Fair Decisions – Participants conduct a voting exercise to decide on a superactivity, collecting and tabulating ballots using different voting methods: plurality, Borda count, plurality-with-elimination, and pair-wise comparison methods. They evaluate each method, discuss fairness, consider strategic voting, compare it to the U.S. presidential voting method, analyze its advantages and disadvantages, and create a report summarizing the results, analysis, and comments on voting methods for the U.S. presidency.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 5: Science Fair or Workshop

Participate in a local, state, or national science fair or mathematics competition OR in any equally challenging STEM-oriented competition or workshop approved by your mentor. An example of this would be an X-Prize type competition.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 5 Helps and Answers

Navigating the STEM Competition Landscape

To locate local, state, or national science fairs, mathematics competitions, or other STEM-oriented competitions for Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award requirement 5, you can try the options below. Obtain your parent’s permission first.

  1. Search online: Use search engines like Google or Bing to search for science fairs, mathematics competitions, or STEM-oriented events in your area or at the national level. Try searching for keywords like “science fair,” “mathematics competition,” “STEM competition,” or “X-Prize competition” along with your location or country name.
  2. Check educational institutions: Contact local schools, colleges, and universities in your area to inquire about any upcoming science fairs or mathematics competitions they might be hosting or participating in. These institutions often organize or sponsor such events.
  3. Explore government or non-profit organizations: Visit the websites of government departments or non-profit organizations focused on education, science, or technology. They frequently organize or support STEM-related competitions and workshops. Examples include national science foundations, science centers, or STEM advocacy groups.
  4. Join STEM networks or organizations: Become a member of local or national STEM networks or organizations that offer resources, support, and information about competitions. They can provide you with updates on upcoming events, workshops, and competitions relevant to your interests.
  5. Follow social media and newsletters: Follow social media accounts and subscribe to newsletters of STEM organizations, universities, and educational institutions. They often share announcements and updates regarding science fairs, mathematics competitions, and other STEM-related activities.
  6. Attend STEM conferences and expos: Participate in STEM conferences, expos, or workshops in your area. These events usually have exhibitors, speakers, and sessions that can introduce you to upcoming competitions and provide networking opportunities.
  7. Ask your mentor or teachers: Consult with your science or mathematics teachers, mentors, or advisors. They may have information about local or national STEM competitions or workshops that you can participate in. They can also guide you to relevant resources or connect you with professionals in the field.

Remember to review the eligibility criteria, application deadlines, and any specific requirements for the competitions or workshops you are interested in. Preparation is key, so allocate enough time to study, research, and develop your project or idea for the competition. Good luck!

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 6: STEM Careers

Do ONE of the following:
6-A. With your parent’s permission and your mentor’s approval, spend at least one day “shadowing” a local scientist or engineer and report on your experience and what you learned about STEM careers to your mentor.
6-B. Learn about a career that is heavily involved with STEM. Make a presentation to your mentor about what you learned

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 6 Helps and Answers

Exploring STEM Careers: A Day in the Life of a Scientist/Engineer

Shadowing a professional in a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) career for Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award requirement 6 can provide valuable insights and help explore different fields. Here are some STEM careers that might be interesting for a high school student to shadow:

  1. Software Engineer: Shadowing a software engineer can provide insights into computer programming, software development, and problem-solving skills.
  2. Biomedical Engineer: Shadowing a biomedical engineer can give students an understanding of how engineering principles are applied in the field of medicine, such as designing medical devices or developing prosthetics.
  3. Environmental Scientist: Shadowing an environmental scientist can offer exposure to research and fieldwork related to environmental conservation, sustainability, and natural resource management.
  4. Data Scientist: Shadowing a data scientist can provide insights into the field of data analysis, machine learning, and statistical modeling, which are in high demand across various industries.
  5. Aerospace Engineer: Shadowing an aerospace engineer can provide an opportunity to learn about aircraft and spacecraft design, propulsion systems, and the exploration of outer space.
  6. Marine Biologist: Shadowing a marine biologist can offer exposure to the study of marine life, ecosystems, and conservation efforts related to oceans, lakes, and rivers.
  7. Robotics Engineer: Shadowing a robotics engineer can introduce students to the field of designing, building, and programming robots used in industries like manufacturing, healthcare, and exploration.
  8. Civil Engineer: Shadowing a civil engineer can provide insights into the design and construction of infrastructure projects like bridges, roads, buildings, and water supply systems.
  9. Geneticist: Shadowing a geneticist can offer exposure to the study of genes, inheritance, and genetic disorders, as well as techniques like DNA sequencing and genetic engineering.
  10. Renewable Energy Engineer: Shadowing a renewable energy engineer can provide an understanding of the design, implementation, and maintenance of renewable energy systems like solar, wind, or hydropower.

Remember that this is just a small selection of STEM careers, and there are many more options available for Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award requirement 6. It’s essential to consider personal interests, aptitudes, and aspirations when choosing a career to shadow.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 7: Presentation

Working with your mentor, organize and present a Nova award or other STEM-related program to a Cub Scout den or pack meeting. Be sure to receive approval from the appropriate unit leader and agree on a time and place for the presentation. If a Cub Scout den or pack is not available, your presentation may be given to another youth group, such as your troop or at your place of worship.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 7 Helps and Answers

Tips for a Presentation

When organizing and presenting a Nova award or other STEM-related program for a Cub Scout den, pack meeting, or another youth group, it’s important to make the experience engaging, informative, and age-appropriate. Here are some tips to help you with your presentation for Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award requirement 7:

  1. Plan ahead: Start by coordinating with your mentor and the appropriate unit leader to get approval for the presentation. Agree on a suitable time, date, and location for the event. Ensure you have all the necessary materials and resources well in advance.
  2. Know your audience: Understand the age group and interests of the Cub Scouts or youth group you’ll be presenting to. Tailor your presentation accordingly to make it engaging and relevant to their level of understanding.
  3. Choose an exciting topic: Select a STEM-related topic that is interesting, interactive, and aligns with the requirements of the Nova award. Consider choosing a topic that offers hands-on activities, experiments, or demonstrations that the Scouts can participate in.
  4. Prepare your materials: Create visual aids, such as slides, posters, or props, to support your presentation. Make sure they are clear, concise, and visually appealing. Prepare any necessary handouts or activity sheets for the Scouts to follow along.
  5. Practice your presentation: Rehearse your presentation beforehand to ensure you’re comfortable with the content and flow. Practice speaking clearly and confidently. Time your presentation to make sure it fits within the allocated time slot.
  6. Incorporate interactive elements: Make your presentation interactive and engaging by including hands-on activities, demonstrations, or group discussions. This will encourage participation and make the learning experience more enjoyable for the Scouts.
  7. Use age-appropriate language: Tailor your language and explanations to suit the age group you’re presenting to. Avoid using jargon or complex terms that might confuse them. Simplify concepts and use relatable examples to enhance understanding.
  8. Encourage questions and participation: Create opportunities for the Scouts to ask questions throughout the presentation or at the end. Foster a supportive and inclusive environment where everyone feels comfortable participating and sharing their thoughts.
  9. Be enthusiastic and energetic: Show your passion for STEM and the topic you’re presenting. Your enthusiasm will help captivate the Scouts’ attention and make the presentation more memorable.
  10. Follow up: After the presentation, offer resources or additional information for further exploration. Provide contact details or references that can help the Scouts continue their STEM journey.

Remember, the key is to make the presentation fun, interactive, and educational. By following these tips, you’ll create a positive learning experience for the Scouts and fulfill the requirements of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 8: Facts and Rules

Review the scientific method (you may know this as the scientific process) and note how scientists establish hypotheses, theories, and laws. Compare how the establishment of “facts” or “rules” using the scientific method differs from the establishment of “facts” or “rules” in other environments, such as legal, cultural, religious, military, mathematical, or social environments.
Then do the following:
A. Choose a modern scientific subject with at least two competing theories on the subject and learn as much as possible about each theory.
B. Analyze the competing theories, decide which one is most convincing to you, and explain why to your mentor.
C. Make a presentation to your mentor that describes the controversy, the competing theories, and your conclusions about how the scientific method can or cannot contribute to the resolution of the controversy.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 8 Helps and Answers

Comparing How Facts and Rules Are Established: Scientific Method vs. Other Environments

Requirement 8 of the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award asks you to compare how the scientific method establishes “facts” or “rules” differently from other environments, like law, culture, religion, the military, math, and society. Here’s a simpler explanation:

  1. Scientific Method: The scientific method is a way scientists investigate things and establish facts or rules. It involves steps like observing, asking questions, making guesses, doing experiments, analyzing data, and drawing conclusions. Scientists use evidence, peer review, and repeating experiments to establish facts or rules. They focus on being fair, questioning everything, and improving knowledge with new evidence.
  2. Legal Environment: In the legal world, facts or rules come from laws, court cases, and how judges interpret them. Facts in court are based on evidence, witnesses, arguments, and previous cases. However, legal facts can be understood differently by people, and rules are made by combining laws and how judges think.
  3. Cultural Environment: Cultural “facts” or “rules” come from beliefs, customs, traditions, and what a group or society thinks. They’re passed down through generations and can differ between cultures. Cultural facts and rules are agreed upon by a community and can change over time.
  4. Religious Environment: In religion, “facts” or “rules” are based on faith, holy texts, teachings, or divine messages. They guide how people behave and are interpreted by religious leaders and individuals. Religious facts or rules may not be scientifically proven but are important to believers.
  5. Military Environment: In the military, facts and rules are based on set protocols, regulations, and procedures. They make sure soldiers work together and follow orders. Military facts and rules are organized hierarchically, with clear command structures.
  6. Mathematical Environment: In math, facts and rules are established using logic and proof. Math facts are based on basic ideas, definitions, and logical steps. They’re not up for interpretation and work universally in math.
  7. Social Environment: In society, facts or rules can be based on collective agreement, customs, and interactions. They can vary across different groups and change over time. Social facts or rules depend on what people believe and what’s considered normal in a community.

To sum up, the scientific method uses evidence and is always improving. Other environments, like law, culture, religion, the military, math, and society, have their own ways of establishing facts or rules. Understanding these differences helps us see how each environment works and thinks about what’s true or important.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 9: Application

Submit your Supernova Award application to the district or council Nova or advancement committee for approval.

Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award Requirement 9 Helps and Answers

How to Apply for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award

The application process for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award involves obtaining an application and filling it out:

  1. Part 1 – Personal Data:
  • Fill in your personal information, including name, address, phone number, date of birth, email, and your Scouts BSA troop.
  • Provide contact information for your mentor.
  1. Part 2 – Award:
  • Indicate which Supernova Award you are applying for, based on your Scouting level (Scouts BSA).
  • Choose the specific Supernova Award you are applying for within your Scouting level (Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award).
  1. Part 3 – Approval:
  • Obtain the approval of your unit leader, who must confirm your registration and eligibility.
  • Sign a statement as a candidate, affirming that you have read and completed all the requirements for the award, with the necessary signatures and approvals.
  • Your mentor must provide their approval and recommendation for you to receive the Supernova Award.
  • The council/district STEM/Nova Committee or Advancement Committee (if no STEM/Nova Committee exists) will review your application and approve it if you have met all the requirements.

Related Resources for the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award

These related ideas and achievements will help you on your way to earning this prestigious award:

Nova Awards Program (STEM Award)

The Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award is part of the BSA Nova Awards program, which focuses on STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education. The program combines knowledge of STEM concepts with hands-on activities. Before starting the STEM Nova or Supernova Awards, it’s important to check with your local council to confirm if the program is available in your area.

The STEM Nova and Supernova Awards are optional awards administered by local councils. Each council has the choice to offer these awards. All activities and programming associated with the STEM Nova Awards must be followed as designed by the BSA. Local councils cannot modify or alter the program’s activities or requirements.

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) is a vital initiative of the Boy Scouts of America to foster curiosity and wonder among youth members. The BSA developed the STEM Nova Awards program to make learning STEM concepts enjoyable and to recognize the efforts of youth participants.

STEM education is crucial for our future as it equips young people with the skills necessary to excel in a global marketplace driven by science and technology. By promoting STEM literacy and engagement, we can cultivate the next generation of critical thinkers and innovators.

The STEM Nova Awards program offers modules that allow Scouts to explore STEM principles and experience the excitement of scientific discovery. By working with an adult counselor or mentor, Scouts can earn these awards and develop a sense of wonder and curiosity. For those seeking an additional challenge, the program also offers the Supernova awards.

Overall, the STEM Nova Awards program aims to inspire Scouts and help them be prepared for life through engaging with STEM subjects and embracing the spirit of innovation.

Thomas Edison Supernova Award

After achieving the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award, Scouts have the opportunity to pursue the Thomas Alva Edison Supernova Award. This award is the silver level Supernova Award for Scouts BSA. To earn the Thomas Alva Edison Supernova Award, Scouts need to accomplish the following requirements:

  1. Earn the Dr. Bernard Harris Supernova Award.
  2. Earn one additional Nova award.
  3. Earn four additional Nova-approved STEM-related merit badges.
  4. Complete two additional Supernova activities.

By meeting these requirements, Scouts can attain the Thomas Alva Edison Supernova Award, furthering their achievements and recognition in the field of STEM within the Scouts BSA program.

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