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Tiger Bobcat Adventure for 2024

The Tiger Bobcat Adventure is the first adventure which Tiger Cub Scouts should complete. This adventure helps them learn the basics of scouting and sets a strong foundation for their future in Scouting. Through this adventure, Tigers start understanding the importance of the Scout Oath and Scout Law, which are central to the character and values promoted by the Scouts BSA organization.

Tiger Bobcat belt loop

Participating in the Tiger Bobcat Adventure, Tiger Cub Scouts begin to develop leadership and character. They engage in activities that teach them about trustworthiness, helpfulness, and friendliness. These experiences not only help them in scouting but also play a vital role in their everyday life. Tiger Cub Scouts learn to apply these principles at home, in school, and within their community.

This adventure also focuses on teaching Tigers how to interact and cooperate with their peers and adults. By working together with other members of their den and their Tiger adult partner, they practice communication and teamwork. These skills are essential for building leadership abilities and for working effectively in a group.

The Tiger Bobcat Adventure is more than just the first belt loop Tigers earn; it’s a stepping stone in their Scouting journey. It encourages them to do their best and to understand and live by the values that will help them grow into responsible and active citizens.

Tiger Bobcat Adventure Requirements

Tiger Bobcat Adventure Requirements

  1. Get to know the members of your den.
  2. Recite the Scout Oath with your den, including your Tiger adult partner.
  3. Have your Tiger adult partner or den leader read the Scout Law to you.  Demonstrate your understanding of being trustworthy, helpful, or friendly. 
  4. Demonstrate the Cub Scout sign, Cub Scout salute and Cub Scout handshake.  Show how each are used.  
  5. Share with your Tiger adult partner, at a den meeting or at home, a time when you have demonstrated the Cub Scout motto “Do Your Best.”
  6. At home, with your parent or legal guardian do the activities in the booklet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide.”

Tiger Bobcat Adventure Resources

Getting to Know Each Other

Get to know the members of your den.

For Tiger Bobcat requirement 1, where Tiger Cub Scouts need to get to know the members of their den, here are some helpful tips for den leaders:

  • Start with a fun introduction game.
    • Pass the Ball – Have the Scouts sit in a circle. Give one Scout a soft ball. When they have the ball, they must say their name and their favorite thing to do after school. After sharing, they pass the ball to another Scout. This continues until everyone has had a turn. This game is easy and helps Scouts learn each other’s names and interests.
    • Color Call Out – This is a simple and active game. Ask each Scout to think of their favorite color. Then, the leader calls out a color, and any Scout whose favorite color matches runs to a designated spot and back. This game not only helps Scouts learn about each other’s favorites but also adds a bit of physical activity to the meeting.
  • Hold a sharing session. Ask each Scout to bring an item from home that is special to them and talk about why it’s important. This activity allows Scouts to share personal stories and interests, helping them connect on a deeper level.
  • Pair up Scouts so they can learn about each other’s hobbies, families, and favorite activities. Have them make Tiger Friendship Bracelets for each other.
  • Allow time for Scouts to talk freely with each other about their week or any exciting news they have. This helps build comfort and familiarity among the group.

Here are some options for fulfilling Tiger Bobcat requirement 1:

  • A Time to Talk – A Time to Listen
    • The Cub Scout sign is a way to help Cub Scouts learn good manners and communication skills.
    • Supplies: None
    • indoor, low energy, minimal prep
  • Den Doodle Tiger
    • The den doodle is a craft project that can be used to track attendance, reward good behavior, and completion of requirements.
    • Supplies: boards, plywood, wood screws, sandpaper, cord, power drill, spray paint, latex paint, paintbrush, pony beads
    • indoor, moderate energy, one week prep
  • Den Flag Tiger
    • A den flag is a craft that can bring your den together by getting to know everyone’s name and having a symbol that everyone has a part in making.
    • Supplies: staff, dowel, concrete mix, water, aluminum foil, 2 gallon paint bucket, sandpaper, felt, Tiger rank badge, twine, sharpie, white chalk, scissors, fabric glue.
    • indoor, low energy, one week prep
  • Me Too Name Game
    • Learn how much everyone in the den has in common.
    • Supplies: none
    • indoor, moderate energy, minimal prep

By focusing on activities like these for Tiger Bobcat, you can help Tigers feel more connected and engaged with their fellow Scouts. This builds a strong, supportive den environment.

The Scout Oath

Recite the Scout Oath with your den, including your Tiger adult partner.

For Tiger Bobcat requirement 2, where Tiger Cub Scouts need to recite the Scout Oath together with their den and Tiger adult partner, here are some straightforward tips for den leaders:

  1. Start by explaining the Scout Oath. Break it down into smaller parts and explain what each line means in simple terms. This helps Scouts understand what they are saying, not just memorizing words.
    • “On my honor, I will do my best” – This means you promise to always try your hardest.
    • “To do my duty to God and my country” – This part tells you to always be good to your faith and be a good citizen in your country.
    • “And to obey the Scout Law” – This means you agree to follow the rules that Scouts live by.
    • “To help other people at all times” – You should always be ready to help anyone who needs it.
    • “To keep myself physically strong,” – Take care of your body by eating right, exercising, and staying healthy.
    • “Mentally awake,” – Keep your mind sharp by learning new things and thinking clearly.
    • “And morally straight.” – Always try to do what is right and be a good person.
  2. Use visual aids. Create a poster with the Scout Oath written on it. Hang it where everyone can see during the meetings. This visual reminder can assist Scouts who are still learning the oath.
  3. Show how it’s used. Explain to the Scouts that the Scout Oath is not just for meetings. It’s a promise to live by the values of Scouting every day. Sharing real-life examples of how they can live the Oath can make it more meaningful.

Learn more about the Scout Oath.

Here are some options for fulfilling Tiger Bobcat requirement 2:

  • Tiger Chatterbox
    • Fold a piece of paper into a chatterbox/fortune teller to introduce the Scout Oath to your Cub Scout.
    • Supplies: Tiger handbook, scissors
    • indoor, low energy, 1 to 3 days prep
  • Tiger Oath and Law Puzzle
    • Introduce the Scout Oath to Cub Scouts by making a puzzle out of popsicle sticks.
    • Supplies: 9 popsicle sticks for each Cub Scout, fine line markers
    • indoor, low energy, 1 to 3 days prep

By following these steps for Tiger Bobcat requirement 2, Tiger Cub Scouts will not only learn to recite the Scout Oath but also start to understand its importance in their daily lives and as part of their growth in Scouting.

The Scout Law 1

The Scout Law

Have your Tiger adult partner or den leader read the Scout Law to you.  Demonstrate your understanding of being trustworthy, helpful, or friendly. 

For Tiger Bobcat requirement 3, where Tiger Cub Scouts demonstrate their understanding of being trustworthy, helpful, or friendly, here’s some guidance for den leaders:

  • Explain the Scout Law: First, read the Scout Law to your Scouts. Explain what being trustworthy, helpful, and friendly means with simple examples.
    • Being trustworthy means keeping promises.
    • Being helpful means doing things for others without being asked.
    • Being friendly means smiling and saying hello to others.
  • Role-playing: Organize a short role-playing activity. Give each Scout a scenario where they can show one of these traits. For example, one scenario could be finding a lost item and returning it to show trustworthiness.
  • Discussion: After the role-play, have a discussion. Ask each Scout to talk about what they did in their scenario and why it shows trustworthiness, helpfulness, or friendliness.
  • Real-life application: Encourage Scouts to share a story from their own life where they were trustworthy, helpful, or friendly. This helps them connect the traits with their daily actions.
  • Games: Consider using this Scout Law Game or this Scout Law Word Search Puzzle to help them learn more about the Scout Law.

Read more about the Scout Law

Here are some options for fulfilling Tiger Bobcat requirement 3:

  • Don’t Wake the Dragon
    • In this game, Cub Scouts have to work together and demonstrate being trustworthy, helpful, and friendly.
    • Supplies: none
    • indoor, moderate energy, minimal prep
  • Tiger Maze
    • Cub Scouts help their adult partner navigate a maze.
    • Supplies: painter’s tape, blindfold
    • indoor, moderate energy, 1 to 3 days prep
  • Tiger Scout Law Bingo
    • Use a bingo card to act out values of the Scout Law.
    • Supplies: printed copies of the Scout Law Bingo Card, pencils or markers
    • indoor, low energy, 1 to 3 days prep

By engaging in these activities and discussions for Tiger Bobcat requirement 3, Tiger Cub Scouts will better understand and demonstrate the qualities of being trustworthy, helpful, and friendly.

Cub Scout Sign, Salute, and Handshake

Demonstrate the Cub Scout sign, Cub Scout salute and Cub Scout handshake.  Show how each are used.  

For Tiger Bobcat requirement 4, where Tiger Cub Scouts need to demonstrate the Cub Scout sign, salute, and handshake, here’s a straightforward way to help them learn:

  • Cub Scout Sign: Teach the Scouts to make the sign by raising their right hand straight up with their index and middle fingers apart, forming a ‘V’.
    • Explain that this sign is used when saying the Scout Oath and Law to remind them to keep their promises.
    • Additionally, the Cub Scout sign is used to signal that it’s time to pay attention. The two raised fingers represent the ears of a Wolf, ready to listen. When a leader raises the sign, all Scouts should stop talking, raise their sign, and pay attention, showing respect and readiness to listen.
  • Cub Scout Salute: Show them how to salute by placing their index and middle fingers of their right hand together, touching the corner of their right eyebrow. This is a way to show respect, especially during the flag ceremony.
  • Cub Scout Handshake: Teach them the handshake, which is done by shaking hands with the left hand while making the Scout sign with the fingers. This special handshake is a way for Scouts to greet each other and show they are Cub Scouts.
  • Practice Time: Allow time for each Scout to practice these in the meeting. Have them practice the sign and salute together, and then pair up to practice the handshake.

Here are some options for fulfilling Tiger Bobcat requirement 4:

  • If You Are Happy Show the Cub Scout Sign
    • Sing the interactive song “If you are happy and you know it” using the Cub Scout sign, handshake, and salute as the actions.
    • Supplies: Tiger Handbook page 7
    • indoor, moderate energy, minimal prep
  • Sign, Salute, and Handshake Relay
    • Use a relay race to get Cub Scouts moving and learning the Cub Scout sign, salute, and handshake.
    • Supplies: Tiger Handbook page 7
    • indoor, very high energy, minimal prep
  • Tiger Simon Says
    • Play a game of Simon Says using the actions of the Cub Scout sign, salute, and handshake.
    • Supplies: Tiger Handbook page 7
    • indoor, high energy, minimal prep

By teaching and practicing these signals for Tiger Bobcat requirement 4, Tiger Cub Scouts learn important symbols of respect and belonging in the Cub Scout community.

Do Your Best

Share with your Tiger adult partner, at a den meeting or at home, a time when you have demonstrated the Cub Scout motto “Do Your Best.”

For Tiger Bobcat requirement 5, where Tiger Cub Scouts need to share a time when they have demonstrated the Cub Scout motto “Do Your Best,” here’s how den leaders can guide them:

  • Discuss the Motto: Start by explaining what “Do Your Best” means. It means trying as hard as you can, no matter what you are doing. No matter what the results, at least you have given it your all.
  • Provide Examples: Give examples of what doing your best might look like. It could be working hard on a school project, helping a friend, or learning a new skill in Scouts.
  • Story Sharing: Ask each Scout to think of a time when they did their best. It can be anything from a time they helped at home to when they tried hard to learn something new.
  • Encourage and Praise: After each Scout shares their story, praise them for their effort and dedication. This will help build their confidence and reinforce the importance of always doing their best.

Here are some options for fulfilling Tiger Bobcat requirement 5:

  • Do Your Best Handbook Activity
    • This activity is in the Tiger handbook where Cub Scouts will identify actions that demonstrate the Cub Scout motto “Do Your Best”
    • Supplies: Tiger handbook pages 8 and 9, crayons or markers
    • indoor, very low energy, minimal prep
  • Do Your Best Handbook Sharing
    • Cub Scouts share with their adult partner a time when they did their best.
    • Supplies: Tiger handbook page 9, crayons or markers
    • indoor, very low energy, minimal prep

This activity for Tiger Bobcat requirement 5 helps Scouts reflect on their actions and see the value in striving to do their best in every situation.

Parent’s Guide

At home, with your parent or legal guardian do the activities in the booklet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide.”

For Tiger Bobcat requirement 6, where Tiger Cub Scouts need to complete activities from the booklet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide” at home with a parent or legal guardian, here’s how den leaders can facilitate this:

  • Inform the Parents: Remind all parents about this requirement. Explain that it is an activity to be done at home with their child.
  • Explain the Importance: Let parents know why this activity is important. It helps keep their children safe and teaches them how to recognize and report unsafe situations.
  • Provide the Booklet: Make sure each family can access the booklet. Provide a link to the booklet on the Scouting website to make it easy.
  • Set a Deadline: Give parents a deadline by when they should complete this activity. This helps ensure that all Scouts finish the requirement in a timely manner.
  • Follow-Up: Ask parents to inform you when they have completed the activity with their child. This can be done via email or at the next den meeting.

Here is an option for fulfilling Tiger Bobcat requirement 6:

By guiding parents and setting clear expectations for Tiger Bobcat requirement 6, den leaders can help ensure that this important activity is completed effectively at home.

Safety Resources

Before any activity, check the SAFE Checklist to make sure everyone is safe. Everyone involved in Scouting America activities should know the Guide to Safe Scouting and other relevant guides or books. Also follow any state or local rules that are more strict than Scouting America rules and guidelines.

Before starting a craft activity, see the Craft Tips video (2 minutes 34 seconds.)

See more information

Frequently Asked Questions for the Tiger Bobcat Adventure

What is the Tiger Bobcat Adventure?

The Tiger Bobcat Adventure is the first adventure Tiger Cub Scouts complete for their Tiger year. It reinforces the basics of scouting, including the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

Who needs to complete the Tiger Bobcat Adventure?

All Tiger Cub Scouts need to complete this adventure. It’s their first step in the Tiger Cub Scout program.

What does the Tiger Bobcat Adventure teach?

It teaches Tiger Cub Scouts important values like trustworthiness and friendliness. They also learn the Cub Scout sign, salute, and handshake.

How long does the Tiger Bobcat Adventure take to complete?

The time to complete the adventure can vary. Typically it can be completed in a single meeting.

Where do Tiger Cub Scouts work on the Tiger Bobcat Adventure?

They work on it during den meetings and at home with their families.

Do parents need to help with the Tiger Bobcat Adventure?

Yes, parents are encouraged to help, especially with the activities that need to be done at home, like learning the Scout Oath and completing the child safety booklet.

What happens after completing the Tiger Bobcat Adventure?

After completing the Tiger Bobcat Adventure, Tiger Cub Scouts get a belt loop and continue to more adventures in the Tiger Cub Scout program.

Starting Strong with the Tiger Bobcat Adventure

The Tiger Bobcat Adventure is the first step for every Tiger Cub Scout. It helps them start their Tiger year on the right foot. By finishing this adventure, Scouts earn a belt loop and learn important Scout values like being trustworthy, helpful, and friendly.

This adventure is more than just saying words. It helps build good character and teaches Scouts how to grow personally and help their community. They work with other Scouts and adults in fun activities that teach them how to work as a team and respect others.

Parents are important in this adventure, too. They help with activities at home, like talking about the Scout Law and going through a safety booklet. This helps Scouts learn better and brings families closer together, sharing Scout values.

In the end, the Tiger Bobcat Adventure sets up Tiger Cub Scouts for a great year of Scouting. It teaches them to be active and caring members of their community. Scouts who finish this adventure are well-prepared to keep learning and growing in Scouting.

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