As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment Requirements

The National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment is an award offered by the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). It aims to recognize Scouts who show a strong commitment to environmental conservation.

The National Outdoor Award Conservation segment and the other available segments.

The badge is available to Scouts who have earned the First Class rank, Sea Scouts with an Apprentice rank, or Venturers who have completed Ranger Award requirements 1-6. Scouts must demonstrate the safe use of five conservation tools from a given list that includes items like a pickax or bow saw. Additionally, ethical usage of these tools must be discussed, emphasizing responsible conservation practices.

You need to complete specific merit badges or Ranger requirements for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. Completion of 25 hours of conservation work under BSA standards is required. These hours can include work done for earlier requirements. If you go beyond the initial 25 hours, you can earn gold and silver devices. A gold device is awarded for each additional 25-hour block of conservation work. For each 100 extra hours, a silver device is earned. You can wear any combination of these devices to signify your total conservation hours.

The National Outdoor Badge for Conservation is a robust program that allows Scouts to engage deeply in environmental conservation. It combines skill building, ethical understanding, and practical experience. If you meet the requirements, you’ll not only gain a badge but also valuable experience that can benefit you and the environment.

National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment Requirements

A Scout, Sea Scout, or Venturer may earn the National Outdoor Badge for Conservation upon successfully completing the following requirements:

  1. Earn the First Class rank, Sea Scout Apprentice rank, or complete Venturing Ranger Award requirements 1-6.
  2. Demonstrate the safe use of five of the following conservation tools: pick or pickax; shovel or spade; ax; bow saw; cross-cut saw; prybar; sledge hammer; loppers or shears; fire rake or McLeod; and/or Pulaski. Discuss the ethical use of the tools you chose.
  3. Complete the requirements for the following:
    1. Environmental Science merit badge or Sustainability merit badge or both Venturing Ranger Conservation core and Ecology elective
    2. Soil and Water Conservation merit badge
    3. One of the following merit badges: Fish and Wildlife Management, Forestry, or Mammals
  4. Complete 25 hours of conservation work under the auspices and standards of the Boy Scouts of America, including hours worked as part of requirements 1 through 3.

A gold device may be earned for each additional 25 hours of conservation work. A silver device is earned for each additional 100 hours of conservation work (for example, the first silver device is earned at 125 total hours of conservation work). Youth may wear any combination of devices totaling his or her current number of hours of conservation work.

Related Resources for National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment

First Class Rank for Scouts BSA

First Class Rank

To be eligible for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment, Scouts BSA must have achieved the First Class rank. This rank signifies a Scout’s commitment to personal growth and development in various areas, including outdoor skills and leadership. By attaining the First Class rank, Scouts demonstrate their readiness to take on more advanced challenges and responsibilities, such as engaging in environmental conservation efforts. It serves as a foundation for Scouts to further their knowledge and skills in conservation, making them eligible to pursue the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment and contribute to the protection of our natural resources.

Venturing Ranger Award

Venturing Ranger Award

Venturing Ranger Award is an alternative path for Venturers to qualify for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. By completing requirements 1-6 of the Venturing Ranger Award, Venturers can demonstrate their readiness and commitment to environmental conservation. This award focuses on developing a wide range of outdoor skills, leadership abilities, and knowledge in areas such as camping, first aid, navigation, and more. By achieving the Venturing Ranger Award, Venturers can showcase their dedication to personal growth and their ability to contribute to the protection of our natural resources for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment.

Conservation Tools

Conservation tools play a crucial role in environmental conservation efforts for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. They are essential for various tasks such as trail maintenance, habitat restoration, and fire management. In this section, we will explore the purpose of each tool, how to use them safely, and their ethical use.

  • Pick or Pickax: The pick or pickax is a versatile tool used for breaking up hard soil, rocks, and ice. Its pointed end allows for effective digging and loosening of compacted surfaces. When using a pick, it is important to wear protective gloves and eye goggles to prevent injuries from flying debris. The ethical use of a pick involves using it only for its intended purpose and avoiding unnecessary damage to the surrounding environment.
  • Shovel or Spade: Shovels or spades are commonly used for digging, lifting, and moving soil, gravel, or other materials. They come in various sizes and shapes, each designed for specific tasks. When using a shovel, it is important to maintain proper body mechanics to prevent strain or injury. Additionally, it is crucial to be mindful of the impact on the ecosystem and avoid disturbing sensitive vegetation or wildlife habitats.
  • Ax: An ax is a cutting tool with a sharp blade attached to a handle. It is primarily used for chopping wood, clearing vegetation, and constructing structures in outdoor settings. When using an ax, it is essential to follow proper safety guidelines, such as wearing protective gloves and maintaining a safe distance from others. Ethical use of an ax involves using it responsibly, avoiding unnecessary damage to trees or plants, and adhering to local regulations regarding tree removal.
  • Bow Saw: A bow saw is a versatile cutting tool used for pruning branches, cutting firewood, and clearing trails. It consists of a narrow blade attached to a frame with a tensioning mechanism. When using a bow saw, it is important to maintain a firm grip and use smooth, controlled motions to prevent accidents. Ethical use of a bow saw includes avoiding excessive cutting of live trees and minimizing damage to the surrounding vegetation.
  • Cross-Cut Saw: A cross-cut saw is a large, two-handled saw used for felling trees and cutting logs into manageable pieces. It requires coordination and teamwork to operate effectively. When using a cross-cut saw, it is crucial to follow proper safety procedures, such as wearing protective gear and maintaining a safe distance from others. Ethical use of a cross-cut saw involves selecting trees for removal based on sustainable forestry practices and minimizing waste by utilizing the harvested wood effectively.
  • Prybar: A prybar is a versatile tool used for lifting heavy objects, removing rocks, and prying apart materials. It is designed to provide leverage and strength for various tasks. When using a prybar, it is important to use it safely and avoid exerting excessive force that could cause injury or damage. Ethical use of a prybar involves using it responsibly and avoiding unnecessary destruction of natural features or habitats.
  • Sledge Hammer: A sledgehammer is a heavy-duty tool used for breaking up rocks, concrete, and other hard materials. It requires strength and controlled force to operate effectively. When using a sledgehammer, it is crucial to wear protective gear, such as safety glasses and gloves, to prevent injuries from flying debris. Ethical use of a sledgehammer involves using it only for its intended purpose and avoiding unnecessary damage to the environment.
  • Loppers or Shears: Loppers or shears are cutting tools used for pruning branches and shrubs. They have long handles and sharp blades that allow for precise cutting. When using loppers or shears, it is important to maintain a firm grip and use them in a controlled manner to prevent accidents. Ethical use of loppers or shears involves selective pruning, avoiding excessive cutting, and promoting the health and growth of plants.
  • Fire Rake or McLeod: A fire rake or McLeod is a specialized tool used for fire management and trail maintenance. It consists of a wide, toothed blade attached to a long handle. It is used to clear vegetation, create firebreaks, and control wildfires. When using a fire rake or McLeod, it is important to follow proper safety protocols and be aware of the surrounding conditions. Ethical use of a fire rake or McLeod involves using it responsibly to prevent the spread of wildfires and minimize disturbance to the ecosystem.
  • Pulaski: A Pulaski is a combination tool that combines an ax and an adze. It is commonly used in firefighting, trail building, and land management. The ax side is used for chopping and cutting, while the adze side is used for digging and grubbing. When using a Pulaski, it is crucial to follow safety guidelines and use it in a controlled manner to prevent accidents. Ethical use of a Pulaski involves using it responsibly and minimizing damage to the environment.

In conclusion, conservation tools are essential for environmental conservation efforts for the National Outdoor Award Conservation segment. By understanding the purpose of each tool, how to use them safely, and their ethical use, we can contribute to the protection and preservation of our natural resources. Remember to always prioritize safety, respect for the environment, and adherence to local regulations when using these tools.

Environmental Science Merit Badge

Environmental Science Merit Badge

The Environmental Science merit badge is a valuable component of the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. It offers Scouts the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the environment and develop essential skills for conservation. This merit badge covers a wide range of topics, including ecosystems, pollution, resource management, and sustainability. Scouts will learn how to identify environmental issues, conduct experiments, and propose solutions. By earning this merit badge, Scouts will gain a comprehensive understanding of environmental science for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment and be better equipped to make a positive impact on the world around them.

Sustainability Merit Badge Helps and Documents

Sustainability Merit Badge

The Sustainability Merit Badge is a option for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. This badge focuses on teaching Scouts about sustainable practices and how to promote a more environmentally friendly lifestyle. Scouts will learn about renewable energy sources, waste reduction, and the importance of conservation in various industries. By earning this badge, Scouts will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to make sustainable choices in their everyday lives and contribute to the preservation of our planet for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment.

Venturing Ranger Conservation Core

The Venturing Ranger Conservation Core is an important component of the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. This option for Requirement 3 focuses on developing Scouts’ understanding of conservation principles and practices. By completing this core, Scouts will gain valuable knowledge and skills in areas such as habitat restoration, wildlife management, and environmental stewardship. It is worth noting that if Scouts choose this option, they must also complete the Ranger Ecology elective, which further enhances their understanding of ecological systems and their role in conservation efforts. The Venturing Ranger Conservation Core provides Scouts with a comprehensive conservation education that prepares them to make a positive impact on the environment for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment.

ranger ecology elective

Venturing Ranger Ecology Elective

The Venturing Ranger Ecology Elective is a crucial component of the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. By choosing this option for Requirement 3, Scouts will delve deeper into the study of ecological systems and their role in conservation efforts. This elective complements the Venturing Ranger Conservation Core, providing Scouts with a comprehensive understanding of conservation principles and practices. Through the Venturing Ranger Ecology Elective, Scouts will gain valuable knowledge and skills in areas such as biodiversity, ecosystem management, and sustainable practices. By completing this elective, Scouts will be well-prepared to contribute to environmental stewardship and make a positive impact on the natural world for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment.

Soil and Water Conservation Merit Badge

The Soil and Water Conservation Merit Badge is an integral part of the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. Scouts who choose this option for Requirement 3-b will gain a deep understanding of the importance of soil and water conservation in environmental stewardship. Through this merit badge, Scouts will learn about the impact of human activities on soil and water resources, as well as strategies for sustainable land and water management. They will explore topics such as erosion control, watershed management, and the role of wetlands in maintaining water quality. By completing this merit badge, Scouts will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to actively contribute to conservation efforts for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment.

Fish and Wildlife Management Merit Badge

The Fish and Wildlife Management Merit Badge is an option in the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. This badge provides Scouts with a comprehensive understanding of the importance of conserving fish and wildlife populations. Through this merit badge, Scouts will learn about habitat conservation, population management, and the role of responsible hunting and fishing practices in maintaining healthy ecosystems. They will explore topics such as wildlife biology, endangered species protection, and the impact of human activities on wildlife habitats. By completing this merit badge, Scouts will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to actively contribute to the conservation of fish and wildlife for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment.

Mammal Study Merit Badge

The Mammal Study merit badge is an excellent choice for Requirement 3-c in the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment. This badge allows Scouts to delve into the fascinating world of mammals and gain a deeper understanding of their importance in the ecosystem. Scouts will learn about different mammal species, their habitats, and their behaviors. They will also explore topics such as conservation efforts to protect endangered mammals and the role of mammals in maintaining a balanced ecosystem. By earning this merit badge, Scouts will develop a greater appreciation for mammals and be inspired to take action in their conservation for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment.

Conservation Project Ideas

In order to fulfill Requirement 4 for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment, Scouts are required to complete a series of conservation projects. These projects are designed to engage Scouts in hands-on activities that contribute to the preservation and protection of the environment. Here are ten conservation project ideas that Scouts can consider:

  • Habitat Restoration: Identify an area in your community that has been degraded or damaged, such as a park or a local waterway. Organize a group of Scouts to clean up the area, remove invasive species, and replant native vegetation to restore the habitat.
  • Recycling Program: Start a recycling program in your school or community. Educate others about the importance of recycling and provide bins for collecting recyclable materials. Monitor and maintain the program to ensure its success.
  • Community Garden: Establish a community garden in an unused or underutilized space. Work with local residents to plan, plant, and maintain the garden. The produce can be donated to local food banks or used to support community events.
  • Wildlife Conservation Awareness Campaign: Create a campaign to raise awareness about the importance of wildlife conservation. Develop educational materials, organize events, and engage with the community to promote the protection of local wildlife and their habitats.
  • Water Conservation Project: Develop a project focused on water conservation. This could include initiatives such as installing low-flow faucets and toilets, organizing educational workshops on water conservation, or implementing rainwater harvesting systems.
  • Energy Efficiency Audit: Conduct an energy efficiency audit in a public building or facility. Identify areas where energy is being wasted and develop recommendations for improvement, such as installing energy-efficient lighting or improving insulation.
  • Beach Cleanup: Organize a beach cleanup event to remove litter and debris from a local beach or shoreline. Raise awareness about the impact of marine pollution and encourage others to take action to protect our oceans and coastal areas.
  • Tree Planting Initiative: Collaborate with local organizations or government agencies to organize a tree planting initiative. Identify areas in need of reforestation and work together to plant native trees that will provide habitat for wildlife and contribute to carbon sequestration.
  • Environmental Education Program: Develop an environmental education program for local schools or youth organizations. Create lesson plans and activities that teach children about the importance of conservation and inspire them to become stewards of the environment.
  • Sustainable Farming Project: Partner with a local farm or agricultural organization to learn about sustainable farming practices. Implement a project that promotes sustainable agriculture, such as composting, organic gardening, or the use of renewable energy sources.

By engaging in these conservation projects, Scouts will not only fulfill the requirements for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment but also make a positive impact on their communities and the environment. These projects provide opportunities for Scouts to develop leadership skills, teamwork, and a sense of responsibility towards the natural world.

Remember, the key to a successful conservation project for the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment is to plan ahead, involve others, and ensure the sustainability of the initiatives. With dedication and commitment, Scouts can make a significant difference in the conservation of our planet.

Frequently Asked Questions about the National Outdoor Award Conservation Segment

What is the National Outdoor Award Conservation segment?

The National Outdoor Award Conservation is a recognition given by the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). It’s aimed at Scouts and Venturers who have shown skill and dedication in environmental conservation projects.

Who is eligible to earn the National Outdoor Award Conservation segment?

Scouts who have earned the First Class rank, Sea Scouts with the Apprentice rank, or those who have completed Venturing Ranger Award requirements 1-6 can pursue this award.

What kind of conservation projects are acceptable for the National Outdoor Award Conservation segment?

Projects can vary widely, from trail maintenance to water quality tests. Always consult with your scoutmaster or advisor for project approval.

Can I work with other organizations for the National Outdoor Award Conservation segment?

Yes, partnering with other organizations like local environmental groups is encouraged. Make sure to get approval from your troop leader.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.