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Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award (Nature and Wildlife Science) Helps and Documents

Note: The Nova program is administered at the Council level. Check with your local council about availability before starting on a Nova award.

The Nova WILD! award is an exciting opportunity for Cub Scouts to delve into the wonders of nature and wildlife science. This award is specifically designed to educate and engage young Scouts in various aspects of the natural world. By participating in the Nova WILD! program, Scouts can gain a deeper understanding of wildlife and develop a sense of appreciation for the environment.

The Nova emblem which can be earned for Nova WILD!

To earn the Nova WILD! award, Scouts have a range of options to choose from. They can watch wildlife-related shows, read about fascinating wildlife topics, or even combine both activities. After completing their chosen activity, Scouts engage in meaningful discussions with their counselor, exploring questions and ideas that arise from their exploration.

In addition to these initial tasks, Scouts must also complete one adventure that is relevant to their rank. They can choose between two special options that involve creating educational materials and engaging in discussions on important subjects such as the water cycle or the food chain.

To truly embrace the role of a naturalist, Scouts are encouraged to complete two additional tasks. These tasks may include investigating endangered or invasive species, visiting a local ecosystem, or studying a specific wild animal in detail. Furthermore, Scouts are required to visit a place where wildlife can be observed, such as a park or zoo.

Throughout the Nova WILD! journey, discussions with counselors play a crucial role. These discussions help Scouts summarize what they have learned, emphasize the importance of wildlife and biodiversity, and address pressing issues like invasive species. The Nova WILD! award is a fantastic opportunity for Cub Scouts to connect with nature, develop a love for wildlife, and become stewards of the environment.

Answers and Helps

Where Can I Find the Answers for the Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award?

Find specific helps for the Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award requirements listed on this page. Some of these resources will just give example answers. Others will provide background information to help you understand the questions.

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 1: Watch or Read

Choose A or B or C and complete ALL the requirements:

A. Watch an episode or episodes (about one hour total) of a show about wildlife, endangered species, invasive species, food chains, biodiversity, ecosystems, or wildlife habitats. Then do the following:
1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you watched.
2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

B. Read (about one hour total) about wildlife, endangered species, invasive species, food chains, biodiversity, ecosystems, or wildlife habitats. Then do the following:
1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read.
2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor.

C. Do a combination of reading and watching (about one hour total) about wildlife, endangered species, invasive species, food chains, biodiversity, ecosystems, or wildlife habitats. Then do the following:
1. Make a list of at least two questions or ideas from what you read and watched.
2. Discuss two of the questions or ideas with your counselor

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 1 Helps and Answers

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 2: Adventure or Activity

Complete ONE adventure from the following list for your current rank or complete option A or B. (If you choose an Adventure, choose one you have not already earned.) Discuss with your counselor what kind of science, technology, engineering, and math was used in the adventure or option.

Wolf Cub Scouts: Digging in the Past or Grow Something or Spirit of the Water
Bear Cub Scouts: A Bear Goes Fishing or Critter Care
Webelos: Into the Wild or Into the Woods

Option A: Do all of the following. (a) Make a poster that shows and explains the water cycle. (b) Set up a simple weather station to record rainfall, temperature, air pressure or evaporation for one week. (c) Find the local weather forecast. Discuss with a family member the weather forecast. Follow-up by discussing the accuracy of the forecast the following day.

Option B: Do all of the following. (a) Explain what natural resources are and why it’s important to protect and conserve them. (b) Make a poster that shows and explains the food chain. Describe to your den or adult what happens when the food chain becomes broken or damaged. (c) Learn about an endangered species. Make a report to your den or adult that includes a picture, how the species became endangered, and what is being done to save it.

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 2 Helps and Answers

Wolf Digging in the Past Adventure

Wolf Digging in the Past Adventure

To further enhance their journey towards earning the Nova WILD! award, Cub Scouts can earn the Wolf Grow Something Cub Scout Adventure to their exploration of nature and wildlife science. The Wolf Digging in the Past Adventure allows Scouts to delve into the fascinating world of archaeology and discover the secrets of the past. By participating in this adventure, Scouts can learn about ancient civilizations, fossils, and the importance of preserving our historical heritage. This adventure provides a unique opportunity for Scouts to connect with the natural world and develop a deeper appreciation for the wonders of the past.

Wolf Grow Something Cub Scout Helps and Ideas

Wolf Grow Something Adventure

To fulfill Nova WILD! requirement 2, Wolf Cub Scouts can complete the Wolf Grow Something Adventure. This adventure allows Scouts to explore the wonders of nature and develop their gardening skills. By participating in this adventure, Scouts can learn about the importance of plants, how they grow, and the role they play in our ecosystem. They will have the opportunity to plant and care for their own garden, witnessing firsthand the magic of seeds sprouting and plants thriving. This adventure provides a hands-on experience that connects Scouts with the natural world and fosters a sense of responsibility towards the environment.

Wolf Spirit of the Water Adventure

Wolf Spirit of the Water Adventure

The Wolf Spirit of the Water Adventure is a perfect addition to the Cub Scout’s journey towards earning the Nova WILD! award. This adventure allows Scouts to explore the fascinating world of water and its importance in our ecosystem. By participating in this adventure, Scouts will learn about the different bodies of water, such as rivers, lakes, and oceans, and the diverse wildlife that inhabits them.

A Bear Goes Fishing Adventure

A Bear Goes Fishing Adventure

The A Bear Goes Fishing Adventure is a fantastic opportunity for Cub Scouts to connect their outdoor experiences with the Nova WILD! award. This adventure allows Scouts to explore the world of fishing and learn about the importance of aquatic ecosystems. By participating in this adventure, Scouts will develop essential fishing skills, such as casting, baiting, and catching fish responsibly

Bear Critter Care Adventure

Bear Critter Care Adventure

The Bear Critter Care Adventure is a perfect opportunity for Cub Scouts to connect their love for animals with the Nova WILD! award. This adventure allows Scouts to learn about the importance of caring for wildlife and their habitats. By participating in this adventure, Scouts will develop essential skills in observing and understanding animal behavior, as well as learning how to create a safe environment for wildlife.

Arrow of Light Into the Wild Adventure

Webelos/AOL Into the Wild Adventure

The Webelos/AOL Into the Wild Adventure encourages Cub Scouts to align their exploration of the natural world with the goals of the Nova WILD! award. This adventure encourages Scouts to delve into the wonders of wildlife and their habitats. By connecting this adventure to the Nova WILD! award, Scouts will not only deepen their understanding of nature and wildlife science but also develop a sense of stewardship towards the environment. Through engaging activities and hands-on experiences, Scouts will learn about different ecosystems, animal adaptations, and the importance of conservation. This adventure is a stepping stone towards becoming knowledgeable and responsible guardians of our wild spaces.

Arrow of Light Into the Woods Adventure

Webelos/AOL Into the Woods Adventure

By completing the Webelos/AOL Into the Woods Cub Scout Adventure as part of the Nova WILD! award, Scouts can further their knowledge and appreciation of nature and wildlife science. This adventure provides an opportunity for Scouts to explore the wonders of the forest and learn about the diverse ecosystems and wildlife that call it home. Through activities such as identifying trees, studying animal tracks, and observing the behavior of woodland creatures, Scouts will develop a deeper understanding of the importance of conservation and the interconnectedness of all living things. By earning the Nova WILD! award alongside this adventure, Scouts will become true stewards of the wilderness.

Printable Explanation of the Water Cycle

The Water Cycle

By providing Scouts with this handout, they can refer to it as they learn about the water cycle and its processes. The visual representation helps them focus and understand the information being presented. Additionally, the printable allows Scouts to engage with the material by drawing their own depiction of the water cycle for the Nova WILD! award, reinforcing their understanding of the concept.

Forecast the Weather

To fulfill the weather requirement for the Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award, Scouts can set up a simple weather station to record various weather parameters for one week. This hands-on activity not only allows Scouts to learn about weather forecasting but also encourages them to observe and analyze weather patterns.

To set up a basic weather station, Scouts will need a few essential tools. They can use a rain gauge to measure rainfall, a thermometer to record temperature, a barometer to measure air pressure, and an evaporation pan to track evaporation. Scouts can place these instruments in a designated area, such as their backyard or a nearby park, where they can easily access and monitor them.

Each day, Scouts should make it a habit to check and record the readings from their weather station. They can note the amount of rainfall, the temperature, the air pressure, and the evaporation rate. By collecting data over the course of a week, Scouts will be able to observe any patterns or changes in the weather.

After the week is complete, Scouts can analyze their data and make predictions about future weather conditions based on their observations. They can discuss how certain weather patterns may indicate upcoming rain, temperature fluctuations, or changes in air pressure. This activity not only teaches Scouts about weather forecasting but also encourages them to develop critical thinking skills and make connections between different weather parameters.

By setting up a simple weather station and recording weather data, Scouts will gain a deeper understanding of how to forecast the weather and appreciate the importance of monitoring weather conditions in our daily lives.

The Food Chain

The food chain is a crucial concept in understanding the delicate balance of nature. It refers to the interconnected relationship between different organisms in an ecosystem, where each organism depends on another for food.

In a typical food chain, there are three main components: producers, consumers, and decomposers. Producers, such as plants and algae, convert sunlight into energy through photosynthesis. They are the foundation of the food chain, as they provide food for the next level of organisms.

Consumers are divided into different levels based on their feeding habits. Primary consumers, also known as herbivores, feed directly on producers. They are followed by secondary consumers, which are carnivores that feed on herbivores. Finally, there are tertiary consumers, which are top predators that feed on other carnivores.

The food chain becomes broken or damaged when one or more organisms are removed or disrupted. This can happen due to various factors, such as habitat destruction, pollution, or overhunting. When a species becomes extinct or its population declines significantly, it can have a ripple effect on the entire food chain. For example, if a top predator disappears, the population of its prey may increase uncontrollably, leading to imbalances in the ecosystem.

Understanding the food chain and the consequences of its disruption is crucial for conservation efforts. By protecting and conserving natural resources, we can help maintain the integrity of the food chain and ensure the survival of all organisms within an ecosystem. It is our responsibility to take action and preserve the delicate balance of nature for future generations.

Endangered Species

Finding Out About Endangered Species in Your Area

This resource goes well with the Nova WILD! requirements, specifically in tasks that involve learning about wildlife and conservation where Scouts are required to investigate endangered species in their state. It could also serve as a basis for the required discussions with counselors about why wildlife and biodiversity are important. The National Parks Conservation Association’s quiz offers an interactive way to learn about endangered species, meeting the Nova WILD! aim to make learning engaging and informative.

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 3: Explore

A. What is wildlife? Wildlife refers to animals that are not normally domesticated (raised by humans).
B. Explain the relationships among producer, prey, predator, and food chain. (You may draw and label a food chain to help you answer this question.)
C. Draw (or find) pictures of your favorite native plant, native reptile or fish, native bird, and native mammal that live in an ecosystem near you. Why do you like these? How do they fit into the ecosystem?
D. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor.

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 3 Helps and Answers

Learn about Wildlife

Wildlife is a term used to describe animals that are not typically domesticated or raised by humans. They exist in their natural habitats, free from human intervention. Understanding wildlife is essential for appreciating the diversity of species and their role in maintaining the balance of ecosystems.

One important aspect of wildlife is the relationships among different organisms in an ecosystem. These relationships include producers, prey, predators, and the food chain. Producers, such as plants and algae, are the foundation of the food chain. They convert sunlight into energy through photosynthesis, providing food for other organisms.

Prey refers to the animals that are hunted and consumed by predators. They are an essential part of the food chain, serving as a source of energy for higher-level organisms. Predators, on the other hand, are the animals that hunt and feed on other animals. They play a crucial role in controlling prey populations and maintaining the balance of ecosystems.

The food chain represents the flow of energy and nutrients from one organism to another. It starts with producers, who are consumed by herbivores (primary consumers). Herbivores are then consumed by carnivores (secondary consumers), and so on. Each level of the food chain is interconnected, and any disruption can have significant consequences for the entire ecosystem.

By learning about wildlife and the intricate relationships within ecosystems, we can better appreciate the importance of conservation and preserving natural habitats. Protecting wildlife and their habitats ensures the survival of diverse species and maintains the delicate balance of nature for future generations.

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 4: Investigate

Act like a naturalist. Choose TWO from A or B or C or D or E or F, and complete ALL the requirements for those options.

A. Investigate the endangered species in your state.
1. Make a list, drawing, or photo collection of three to five animals and plants that are endangered.
2. Design a display (a poster, PowerPoint presentation, or other type of display) to show at least 10 of the threatened, endangered, or extinct species in your state. (You may use your drawings or photo collection in your display.)
3. Discuss with your counselor the differences between threatened, endangered, and extinct species. Discuss how threatened animals or plants could become endangered or extinct. How might the loss of these animals or plants affect the ecosystem and food chain? What can be done to preserve these species?

B. Investigate invasive species.
1. Make a list, drawing, or photo collection of at least five mammals, plants, fish, birds, insects, or any other organisms that are invasive in your state or region of the country.
2. Design a presentation (a poster, PowerPoint presentation, or other display) including at least one of the invasive species from your list. Explain where they came from, how they got to your area, what damage they are causing, and what is being done to get rid of them. Share your presentation with your counselor and your family or your den.
3. Discuss with your counselor what an invasive species is, how invasive animals or plants cause problems for native species, and how these invasive species could affect an ecosystem and food chain.

C. Visit an ecosystem near where you live.
1. Investigate the types of animals and plants that live in that ecosystem.
2. Draw a food web of the animals and plants that live in this ecosystem. Mark the herbivores, omnivores, and carnivores. Include at least one decomposer or scavenger.
3. Discuss with your counselor (using your food web drawing) how the animals or plants in the food web fit into a food chain. Which animals are predators and which can be prey? How does each plant and animal obtain its energy? Describe the energy source for all the plants and animals.

D. Investigate one wild mammal, bird, fish, or reptile that lives near you.
1. Create a diorama representing the habitat of this creature. Include representations of everything it needs to survive; its home, nest, or den; and possible threats. You may use a variety of different materials within your diorama (usually constructed in a shoebox or similar container).
2. Explain to your counselor what your animal must have in its habitat in order to survive.

E. Investigate your wild neighbors.
1.Make a bird feeder and set it up in a place where you may observe visitors. The feeder could be complex or as simple as a pinecone covered with peanut butter and rolled in birdseed and then tied with a string to an appropriate location, like a tree branch.
2. Fill the feeder with birdseed. (Make sure that your feeder does not remain empty once you have started feeding birds.)
3. Provide a source of water.
4. Watch and record the visitors to your feeder for two or three weeks. (It may take a while for visitors to discover your food source.)
5. Identify your visitors using a field guide, and keep a list of what visits your feeder. (Visitors are not always birds! Sometimes deer, rabbits, chipmunks, squirrels, and raccoons visit bird feeders—or the area under the feeder! The kinds of nonbird visitors will depend on where you live. You may want to investigate how to collect the tracks of any nighttime visitors.)
6. Discuss with your counselor what you learned about your wild neighbors.

F. Earn the Cub Scout World Conservation Award (if you have not already earned them for another Nova award).

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 4 Helps and Answers

Investigate Endangered Species

To fulfill Nova WILD! requirement 4A, Cub Scouts are encouraged to investigate the endangered species in their state. This activity provides an opportunity to learn about the importance of biodiversity and the threats faced by various species.

When investigating endangered species, it is essential to understand the differences between threatened, endangered, and extinct species. Threatened species are those that are at risk of becoming endangered in the near future. Endangered species, on the other hand, are those that are at a high risk of extinction. Extinct species are those that no longer exist.

Discussing the factors that contribute to the decline of species is crucial. Habitat loss, pollution, climate change, and illegal hunting are some of the main causes. By understanding these factors, Cub Scouts can gain insight into how threatened animals or plants could become endangered or extinct.

Furthermore, it is important to explore the impact of the loss of these species on the ecosystem and food chain. Endangered species play vital roles in maintaining the balance of ecosystems. Their disappearance can disrupt the food chain and lead to cascading effects on other species.

To preserve these species, various conservation efforts can be undertaken. These include habitat restoration, captive breeding programs, and public awareness campaigns. Cub Scouts can discuss these strategies with their counselor and explore ways in which they can contribute to the preservation of endangered species in their state.

By investigating endangered species, Cub Scouts develop a deeper appreciation for the importance of biodiversity and the need for conservation efforts to protect these vulnerable species.

Investigate Invasive Species

To fulfill Nova WILD! requirement 4B, Cub Scouts are tasked with learning about invasive species in their area. An invasive species refers to a non-native plant, animal, or microorganism that has been introduced to an ecosystem and has the potential to cause harm to the environment, economy, or human health.

Invasive species can cause significant problems for native species. They often outcompete native species for resources such as food, water, and habitat, leading to a decline in native populations. Invasive plants, for example, can grow rapidly and form dense thickets, shading out native vegetation and disrupting the natural balance of the ecosystem.

The impact of invasive species on an ecosystem can be far-reaching. They can alter the structure and function of ecosystems, disrupt the food chain, and reduce biodiversity. Invasive animals may prey on native species, leading to population declines or even extinctions. Invasive plants can also disrupt pollination processes, affecting the reproduction of native plants and the animals that depend on them.

Understanding the effects of invasive species on ecosystems and food chains is crucial for Cub Scouts. By investigating invasive species, they can gain insight into the importance of preventing their introduction and spread. They can also explore strategies for managing invasive species, such as early detection and rapid response, biological control, and public education.

By learning about invasive species, Cub Scouts develop an awareness of the impact of human activities on ecosystems and the importance of responsible stewardship to protect native species and maintain the balance of natural habitats.

Visit an Ecosystem

To fulfill the Nova WILD! requirement of visiting an ecosystem, Cub Scouts can explore the intricate connections within a food web. By discussing how the animals and plants in the food web fit into a food chain, they can gain a deeper understanding of the relationships between predators and prey.

In an ecosystem, each plant and animal plays a vital role in obtaining and transferring energy. By describing the energy source for all the plants and animals, Cub Scouts can learn about the different ways organisms obtain their energy. Some animals, like predators, obtain their energy by consuming other animals, while others, like herbivores, obtain their energy by consuming plants.

By examining the food web, Cub Scouts can identify the various energy pathways and the interdependence of species within the ecosystem. They can observe how changes in one population can affect the entire food chain. For example, if a predator population declines, it can lead to an increase in the prey population, which in turn can impact the availability of resources for other organisms.

Visiting an ecosystem and studying its food web allows Cub Scouts to appreciate the delicate balance of nature and the importance of preserving biodiversity. They can also recognize the potential impact of human activities on these ecosystems and the need for responsible conservation practices.

Through this exploration, Cub Scouts can develop a greater appreciation for the complexity and interconnectedness of ecosystems, fostering a sense of stewardship and a commitment to protecting these valuable habitats.

Investigate a Wild Animal

To fulfill the Nova WILD! requirement of investigating an animal, Cub Scouts can delve into the fascinating world of animal habitats. By discussing the various aspects of an animal’s habitat, such as its home, nest, den, and food sources, they can gain a deeper understanding of what animals need to survive.

Habitats play a crucial role in providing the necessary resources for animals to thrive. Each animal has specific requirements for shelter, food, and water, which are essential for their survival. By studying different habitats, Cub Scouts can learn about the diverse adaptations that animals have developed to meet these needs.

During their investigation, Cub Scouts can explore the unique characteristics of various animal habitats, such as forests, deserts, oceans, or grasslands. They can discuss the specific features that make each habitat suitable for certain species, including the availability of food, water, and shelter.

Furthermore, Cub Scouts can also examine the threats that animals face in their habitats, such as habitat loss, pollution, and climate change. By understanding these challenges, they can develop a greater appreciation for the importance of conservation efforts and the need to protect and preserve animal habitats.

Through their investigation of animal habitats, Cub Scouts can develop a deeper connection with the natural world and a sense of responsibility towards the well-being of animals. They can also gain a greater understanding of the delicate balance that exists within ecosystems and the interconnectedness of all living organisms.

By exploring the intricacies of animal habitats, Cub Scouts can foster a love for wildlife and become advocates for the protection of these precious environments.

Investigate Your Wild Neighbors

As part of the Nova WILD! award, Cub Scouts are encouraged to investigate their wild neighbors and learn more about the interactions between different species in their local environment. One way to do this is by observing and studying the behavior of birds that visit bird feeders.

To fulfill Requirement 4E of the Nova WILD! award, Cub Scouts can start by describing how to make a bird feeder using a pine cone, peanut butter, and birdseed. This simple DIY project not only provides an opportunity for creativity but also attracts various bird species to the feeder.

Once Cub Scouts begin feeding birds, they will quickly realize the importance of consistent food provision. Birds rely on a steady food source, especially during times when natural food may be scarce. By regularly providing food, Cub Scouts can support the well-being and survival of their feathered friends.

However, it’s not just birds that may be attracted to a bird feeder. Other animals, such as squirrels, chipmunks, and even raccoons, may also be enticed by the available food. This presents an opportunity for Cub Scouts to observe and learn about the interactions between different species and the challenges that arise when multiple animals compete for the same resources.

By investigating their wild neighbors through bird feeding, Cub Scouts can develop a deeper understanding of the delicate balance of nature and the interconnectedness of different species. They can also gain insights into the behaviors and adaptations of various animals, fostering a sense of appreciation and respect for the wildlife in their local environment.

Cub Scout World Conservation Award

The Cub Scout World Conservation Award is closely connected to the Nova WILD! award. Both awards focus on fostering an understanding and appreciation for nature and wildlife. By earning the Cub Scout World Conservation Award, Cub Scouts can further their knowledge and commitment to conservation efforts. This award encourages Cub Scouts to take action in their communities by participating in conservation projects, learning about environmental issues, and promoting sustainable practices. By connecting the Cub Scout World Conservation Award to the Nova WILD! award, Cub Scouts can deepen their understanding of the importance of conservation and become advocates for protecting our natural world.

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 5: Visit

Visit a place where you can observe wildlife. Examples include parks (national, state, and local), zoos, wetlands, nature preserves, and national forests.

A. During or after your visit, talk to someone about:
1. The native species, invasive species, and endangered or threatened species that live there. If you visit a zoo, talk to someone about the ecosystems for different zoo animals and whether any of the zoo animals are invasive in different areas of the world. (For example, pythons are often found in zoos, but they are an invasive species in Florida.)
2. The subjects studied in school that enable him or her to work with wildlife. Examples of experts to talk to include forest ranger, wildlife biologist, botanist, park ranger, naturalist, game warden, zookeeper, docent, or another adult whose career involves wildlife.

B. Discuss with your counselor what you learned during your visit.

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 5 Helps and Answers

Observing Wildlife

To observe wildlife, you can visit various places such as parks, zoos, wetlands, nature preserves, and national forests. These locations provide opportunities to learn about native species, endangered species, and invasive species. By observing wildlife in their natural habitats, Cub Scouts can gain a deeper understanding of the importance of conservation and the need to protect these species.

When visiting these places, Cub Scouts can learn about the characteristics and behaviors of native species. They can observe how these species interact with their environment and the role they play in maintaining a balanced ecosystem. Additionally, they can learn about the challenges faced by endangered species and the efforts being made to protect them.

Furthermore, visiting these locations can also provide insights into wildlife-related jobs. Cub Scouts can learn about careers such as park rangers, wildlife biologists, zookeepers, and environmental educators. Understanding these careers can inspire Cub Scouts to pursue their interests in wildlife and conservation.

By observing wildlife in different settings, Cub Scouts can develop a greater appreciation for the natural world and the importance of protecting it. This firsthand experience allows them to connect with nature and become advocates for wildlife conservation.

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 6: Discuss

Discuss with your counselor:
A. Why wildlife is important
B. Why biodiversity is important
C. The problems with invasive species and habitat destruction

Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award Requirement 6 Helps and Answers

Discuss

Discussing the importance of wildlife and biodiversity is crucial for Cub Scouts to understand the significance of conservation. By engaging in discussions about these topics, they can develop a deeper appreciation for the natural world and the need to protect it.

Firstly, it is important to discuss why wildlife is important. Wildlife plays a vital role in maintaining the balance of ecosystems. Different species have specific roles, such as pollination, seed dispersal, and controlling pest populations. By discussing these roles, Cub Scouts can understand how each species contributes to the overall health and functioning of an ecosystem.

Secondly, discussing the importance of biodiversity is essential. Biodiversity refers to the variety of life forms on Earth. It is important because it ensures the resilience and stability of ecosystems. By discussing the concept of biodiversity, Cub Scouts can learn about the interconnectedness of different species and the impact that the loss of one species can have on the entire ecosystem.

Lastly, it is important to address the problems associated with invasive species and habitat destruction. Invasive species can disrupt native ecosystems by outcompeting native species for resources. Discussing the negative effects of invasive species can help Cub Scouts understand the importance of preventing their introduction and spread. Additionally, discussing habitat destruction can raise awareness about the impact of human activities on wildlife and the need for conservation efforts.

By engaging in discussions about these topics, Cub Scouts can develop a deeper understanding of the importance of wildlife, biodiversity, and the threats they face. This knowledge can inspire them to take action and become advocates for wildlife conservation.

Related Resources for the Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award for Nature and Wildlife Science

More about Nova WILD! and the Nova Awards Program (STEM Award)

The BSA Nova awards are a series of awards that Cub Scouts can earn to explore various STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) topics. These awards encourage Scouts to engage in hands-on activities and learn about different scientific concepts. The Nova WILD! award is one of the Nova awards available and focuses specifically on nature and wildlife science. By completing the requirements for the Nova WILD! award, Cub Scouts can learn about ecosystems, wildlife conservation, and the importance of protecting our natural world. This award provides an opportunity for Scouts to develop a deeper understanding of the natural world and become stewards of the environment.

Frequently Asked Questions about the Nova WILD! Cub Scout Nova Award for Nature and Wildlife Science

What is the purpose of the Nova WILD! Award?

The Nova WILD! Award aims to educate you about wildlife and natural ecosystems. It offers a series of activities and requirements that focus on wildlife, endangered species, food chains, and more.

Can I use online materials for Nova WILD! requirements?

Yes, you can watch online videos or read online articles with your counselor’s approval and under your parent’s supervision.

What activities are involved in Nova WILD! Requirement 4 “Act like a naturalist”?

You must complete two from a list of options that involve investigating endangered species, invasive species, local ecosystems, and more. Activities include making lists, designing presentations, and discussing your findings.

Do I need to visit a place to observe wildlife for the Nova WILD! award?

Yes, a visit to a park, zoo, wetland, or nature preserve is required. You need to talk to an expert during or after your visit about native species, invasive species, and endangered or threatened species.

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