Boy Scout Archives: Reading Merit Badge

Reading Merit BadgeIf you have ever wanted to go back in time or wished you could visit the future, if you are curious about the world, or if you are interested in how things work or like to learn new things, these are all reasons why you should want to read. Reading is fascinating. It’s full of surprises. And it will take you places you can’t get to in any other way.

Reading Merit Badge Requirements

  1. Do EACH of the following:
    1. Learn how to search your library’s card catalog or computerized catalog by author, title, and subject.
    2. With the assistance of your merit badge counselor or a librarian, select six books of four different types (such as poetry, drama/plays, fiction, nonfiction, biographies, etc.). Ask your librarian or counselor about award-winning books that are recommended for readers your age and include at least one of those titles.
    3. Find the books in the library catalog. With your counselor’s or a librarian’s assistance, locate the books on the shelves.
    4. Read each book. Keep a log of your reading that includes the title of the book, the pages or chapters read, the date you completed them, and your thoughts about what you have read so far. Discuss your reading with your counselor. Using your log as a reference, explain why you chose each book and tell whether you enjoyed it and what it meant to you.
  2. Read about the world around you from any two sources–books, magazines, newspapers, the Internet (with your parent’s permission), field manuals, etc. Topics may include sports, environmental problems, politics, social issues, current events, nature, religion, etc. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor.
  3. Do ONE of the following:
    1. From a catalog of your choice, fill out an order form for merchandise as if you intended to place an order. Share the completed form with your counselor and discuss it.
    2. With your parent’s permission, locate at least five Web sites that are helpful for your Scouting or other activities. Write the Internet addresses of these sites in your log. Talk with your counselor or a librarian about safety rules for using the Internet.
  4. With your counselor’s and your parent’s permission, choose ONE of the following activities and devote at least four hours of service to that activity. Discuss your participation with your counselor.
    1. Read to a sick, blind, or homebound person in a hospital or in an extended-care facility.
    2. Perform volunteer work at your school library or a public library.
    3. Read stories to younger children, in a group or individually.

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